microflora


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microflora

(ˈmaɪkrəʊˌflɔːrə)
n
(Biology) the community of microorganisms, including algae, fungi, and bacteria that live in or on another living organism or in a particular habitat

mi•cro•flo•ra

(ˌmaɪ kroʊˈflɔr ə, -ˈfloʊr ə)

n., pl. -flo•ras, -flo•rae (-ˈflɔr i, -ˈfloʊr i)
(used with a sing. or pl. v.)
the microscopic plants of a habitat or microhabitat.
[1900–05]
mi`cro•flo′ral, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.microflora - microscopic plants; bacteria are often considered to be microflora
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
microorganism, micro-organism - any organism of microscopic size
Translations

microflora

n microflora
References in periodicals archive ?
Featuring nourishing whole foods supplied by MegaFood's organic farm partners, including organic turmeric root, organic cranberry and organic ginger, each new MegaFlora product also features a unique blend of prebiotic foods to support colonization and health of existing microflora.
USDA-ARS scientists examined the microflora on the surface of plums to find potential biocontrol agents against brown rot.
A small US study found a number of differences between the bacterial inhabitants of contact lens wearers compared with non-lens wearers, with the surface microflora of lens wearers found to more closely resemble the skin of the eyelid than the eyes of non-wearers.
Intestinal microflora have been associated with obesity later in life, and as antibiotics are known to alter microflora diversity and composition, the role and influence of antibiotics in early childhood obesity needs to be determined.
Moreover, it involves Academic partners with top expertise in atherosclerosis, sphingolipid metabolism, and gut microflora to validate targets in the ceramide metabolism.
The Company is developing an oral biologic to protect the gastrointestinal (GI) microflora from the effects of intravenous (IV) antibiotics for the prevention of C.
and Enterome Bioscience SA have entered into an agreement to conduct metagenomic research on the effects of beta-lactam antibiotics on the gastrointestinal microflora (microbiome) of human patients.
NYSE MKT: SYN), a developer of novel anti-infective biologic and drug candidates targeting specific pathogens that cause serious infections and diseases, and Enterome Bioscience SA, a pioneer in the development of innovative disease management solutions based on a deep understanding of the gut microbiome, today announced that they have entered into an agreement to conduct metagenomic research on the effects of beta-lactam antibiotics on the gastrointestinal microflora (microbiome) of human patients.
High frequency of persistent viral infections with various representatives of the microflora, uncertain clinical symptoms and asymptomatic course for a long time were the main reasons for inadequate attitude to these diseases [7, 8, 9, 10].
A brief introduction to the history of research on probiotic microflora is followed by chapters that proceed from possible receptor mechanisms and sites of action, through particular uses such as antiviral, parasitic immunity, allergy and inflammation reduction, to newer and more experimental research such as wound treatment and isolation of possible mediating compounds.
Mounting evidence indicates that dysregulated gut microflora contributes in a significant way to a variety of diseases, including diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, allergies, inflammatory bowel disease, and others (Ley et al.
5-10) Increasing knowledge, both empirical and experimental, supports the fact that there is a critical need to focus on gut microflora ecology and barrier function, proper hydration, and cell polarity and quorum sensing to maximize colonization and microflora biodiversity.