micronation

(redirected from Micronationalism)

micronation

(ˈmaɪkrəuˌneɪʃən)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an entity, typically existing only on the internet or within the private property of its members, that lays claim to sovereign status as an independent nation, but which is unrecognized by real nations
References in periodicals archive ?
23) The term micronationalism was coined by Ted Gurr in order to describe the independence movements of numerically small groups like the 96,000 Muslim Abkhaz in the north-western corner of Georgia and the 164,000 Ossets in northern Georgia who wanted to be united with the 402,000 Ossets living in the homonym autonomous region in southern Russia.
The producer of the film, Marty Callaghan, is a war documentarian, who recently produced, "Blood, Sand and Oil" regarding World War I in the Middle East and Allied use of micronationalism from the Caucasus to the Arabian Peninsula to destroy the multi-ethnic, multi-cultural Ottoman Empire, and replace it with states servile to western empires.
The term micronationalism was first employed by May (1982) in the context of Papua New Guinea to describe a 'varied collection of movements which displayed a common tendency, at least at an ideological or psychological level, to disengage from the wider economic and political systems imposed by colonial rule, seeking in a sense a common identity and purpose, and through some combination of traditional and modern values and organisational forms, an acceptable formula for their own development' (May 1982:2).
We live in a fragmented and divided world, as indicated by the implosion of many nation-states, the increased focus on ethnicity, and the rise of micronationalism and statelessness.
Since the push for Greater Serbia began to ignite every other micronationalism in the region, I had not heard the voice of Praxis above the snarlings and detonations.
It is precisely this disintegration of central authority that has given rise to rampant micronationalism, a force that is tearing asunder the political cohesion that had papered over divisions whose origins are to be found in earlier crises in capitalism, and particularly in the peace settlements and state formation following the first and second World Wars.
60) The forces of postnationalist India produce "reactionary micronationalisms where questions of race, class, gender, and nationality are in constant collision.