microorganism

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mi·cro·or·gan·ism

 (mī′krō-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
n.
An organism or infectious agent of microscopic or submicroscopic size, especially a bacterium or protozoan.

microorganism

(ˌmaɪkrəʊˈɔːɡəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Microbiology) any organism, such as a bacterium, protozoan, or virus, of microscopic size

mi•cro•or•gan•ism

(ˌmaɪ kroʊˈɔr gəˌnɪz əm)

n.
any organism too small to be viewed by the unaided eye, as bacteria or some fungi and algae.
[1875–80]
mi`cro•or•gan′ic
(-ɔrˈgæn ɪk)
adj.

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī′krō-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
An organism that can be seen only with the aid of a microscope. Microorganisms include bacteria, protozoans, algae, and fungi. See Note at germ.

microorganism

any one of a large variety of microscopic or ultramicroscopic organisms, as bacteria, viruses, etc.
See also: Organisms
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.microorganism - any organism of microscopic sizemicroorganism - any organism of microscopic size  
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
monad - (biology) a single-celled microorganism (especially a flagellate protozoan)
intestinal flora - harmless microorganisms (as Escherichia coli) that inhabit the intestinal tract and are essential for its normal functioning
virus - (virology) ultramicroscopic infectious agent that replicates itself only within cells of living hosts; many are pathogenic; a piece of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) wrapped in a thin coat of protein
moneran, moneron - organisms that typically reproduce by asexual budding or fission and whose nutritional mode is absorption or photosynthesis or chemosynthesis
bacteria, bacterium - (microbiology) single-celled or noncellular spherical or spiral or rod-shaped organisms lacking chlorophyll that reproduce by fission; important as pathogens and for biochemical properties; taxonomy is difficult; often considered to be plants
microbe, germ, bug - a minute life form (especially a disease-causing bacterium); the term is not in technical use
pathogen - any disease-producing agent (especially a virus or bacterium or other microorganism)
protoctist - any of the unicellular protists
protist, protistan - free-living or colonial organisms with diverse nutritional and reproductive modes
pilus - hairlike structure especially on the surface of a cell or microorganism
virulence, virulency - extreme harmfulness (as the capacity of a microorganism to cause disease); "the virulence of the plague"
transmitter, vector - any agent (person or animal or microorganism) that carries and transmits a disease; "mosquitos are vectors of malaria and yellow fever"; "fleas are vectors of the plague"; "aphids are transmitters of plant diseases"; "when medical scientists talk about vectors they are usually talking about insects"
microflora - microscopic plants; bacteria are often considered to be microflora
bacteremia, bacteriaemia, bacteriemia - transient presence of bacteria (or other microorganisms) in the blood

microorganism

also micro-organism
noun
A minute organism usually producing disease:
Translations
mikroorganismus
mikroorganisme
mikro-organismi
מיקרואורגניזם
mikroorganizam
mikroorganisme
微生物

microorganism

[ˈmaɪkrəʊˈɔːgənɪzəm] Nmicroorganismo m

microorganism

[ˌmaɪkrəʊˈɔːgəˌnɪzm] nmicroorganismo

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

n. microorganismo, organismo que no puede verse a simple vista.

microorganism

n microorganismo, microbio
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