parasitism

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Related to Microparasites: Macroparasites

par·a·sit·ism

 (păr′ə-sĭ-tĭz′əm, -sī-)
n.
1. A relationship between two organisms of different species in which one is a parasite and the other is a host.
2. The characteristic behavior or mode of existence of a parasite or parasitic population.
3. Parasitosis.

parasitism

(ˈpærəsaɪˌtɪzəm)
n
1. (Biology) the relationship between a parasite and its host
2. (Pathology) the state of being infested with parasites
3. the state of being a parasite
4. (Biology) the state of being a parasite

par•a•sit•ism

(ˈpær ə saɪˌtɪz əm, -sɪ-)

n.
1. a relation between organisms in which one lives as a parasite on another.
2. a parasitic mode of existence.
3. a diseased condition due to parasites.
[1605–15]

par·a·sit·ism

(păr′ə-sĭ-tĭz′əm)
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which one organism benefits and the other is generally harmed. See Note at symbiosis.

parasitism

a relationship between animals in which one gains sustenance from the other. Cf. commensalism. See also biology; plants.
See also: Animals
a relationship between plants in which one gains sustenance from the other. See also animals; biology.
See also: Plants
the living together of two organisms in a relationship that is beneficial to one and destructive to the other. — parasitic, parasitical, adj.
See also: Biology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.parasitism - the relation between two different kinds of organisms in which one receives benefits from the other by causing damage to it (usually not fatal damage)
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
Translations

parasitism

[ˈpærəsɪtɪzəm] Nparasitismo m

parasitism

[ˈpærəsaɪˌtɪzm] nparassitismo

par·a·si·tism

n. parasitismo, infección de parásitos.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aggregation and distribution of strains in microparasites.
Interactions between macroparasites and microparasites drive infection patterns in free-ranging African buffalo.
In order to understand how six microparasites regulate Daphnia populations and drive the populations to extinction, Ebert et al.
helminths), which change host demography and may interact directly with microparasites via the host s immune system.
In the models of microparasites and macroparasites Anderson and May (1), (2) have analyzed how the threshold phenomena for the persistence of epidemics are modified when population size is variable.