microorganism

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mi·cro·or·gan·ism

 (mī′krō-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
n.
An organism or infectious agent of microscopic or submicroscopic size, especially a bacterium or protozoan.

microorganism

(ˌmaɪkrəʊˈɔːɡəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Microbiology) any organism, such as a bacterium, protozoan, or virus, of microscopic size

mi•cro•or•gan•ism

(ˌmaɪ kroʊˈɔr gəˌnɪz əm)

n.
any organism too small to be viewed by the unaided eye, as bacteria or some fungi and algae.
[1875–80]
mi`cro•or•gan′ic
(-ɔrˈgæn ɪk)
adj.

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

(mī′krō-ôr′gə-nĭz′əm)
An organism that can be seen only with the aid of a microscope. Microorganisms include bacteria, protozoans, algae, and fungi. See Note at germ.

microorganism

any one of a large variety of microscopic or ultramicroscopic organisms, as bacteria, viruses, etc.
See also: Organisms
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.microorganism - any organism of microscopic sizemicroorganism - any organism of microscopic size  
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
animal, animate being, beast, creature, fauna, brute - a living organism characterized by voluntary movement
plant life, flora, plant - (botany) a living organism lacking the power of locomotion
monad - (biology) a single-celled microorganism (especially a flagellate protozoan)
intestinal flora - harmless microorganisms (as Escherichia coli) that inhabit the intestinal tract and are essential for its normal functioning
virus - (virology) ultramicroscopic infectious agent that replicates itself only within cells of living hosts; many are pathogenic; a piece of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) wrapped in a thin coat of protein
moneran, moneron - organisms that typically reproduce by asexual budding or fission and whose nutritional mode is absorption or photosynthesis or chemosynthesis
bacteria, bacterium - (microbiology) single-celled or noncellular spherical or spiral or rod-shaped organisms lacking chlorophyll that reproduce by fission; important as pathogens and for biochemical properties; taxonomy is difficult; often considered to be plants
microbe, germ, bug - a minute life form (especially a disease-causing bacterium); the term is not in technical use
pathogen - any disease-producing agent (especially a virus or bacterium or other microorganism)
protoctist - any of the unicellular protists
protist, protistan - free-living or colonial organisms with diverse nutritional and reproductive modes
pilus - hairlike structure especially on the surface of a cell or microorganism
virulence, virulency - extreme harmfulness (as the capacity of a microorganism to cause disease); "the virulence of the plague"
transmitter, vector - any agent (person or animal or microorganism) that carries and transmits a disease; "mosquitos are vectors of malaria and yellow fever"; "fleas are vectors of the plague"; "aphids are transmitters of plant diseases"; "when medical scientists talk about vectors they are usually talking about insects"
microflora - microscopic plants; bacteria are often considered to be microflora
bacteremia, bacteriaemia, bacteriemia - transient presence of bacteria (or other microorganisms) in the blood

microorganism

also micro-organism
noun
A minute organism usually producing disease:
Translations
mikroorganismus
mikroorganisme
mikro-organismi
מיקרואורגניזם
mikroorganizam
mikroorganisme
微生物

microorganism

[ˈmaɪkrəʊˈɔːgənɪzəm] Nmicroorganismo m

microorganism

[ˌmaɪkrəʊˈɔːgəˌnɪzm] nmicroorganismo

mi·cro·or·gan·ism

n. microorganismo, organismo que no puede verse a simple vista.

microorganism

n microorganismo, microbio
References in periodicals archive ?
The system to which she refers in the text is bioMerieux's automated BacT/ALERT, based on the detection of carbon dioxide released by microrganism activity.
The effect of osmotic stress on the growth of microrganism was investigated in view of the osmotic pressure build up in fermentation systems designed to favour high volumetric ethanol productivity.
The LM of steers had the highest content of vaccenic acid (18:1 t-11), an important intermediate produced by microrganisms in the rumen and transformed into CLA (18:2 c-9, t-11--rumenic acid) in the muscular tissue of ruminants (Bauman et al.
This covers the evaluation of quality in cultured fish and fish health assessment, essential nutrients (including vitamins, amino acids, peptides, lipids, and minerals), natural substances such as microrganisms and plants, and upcoming strategies in nutrigenomics and food safety.
Thus, we also tested coleon U (1) and 6[beta],7[alpha]-dihydroxyroyleanone (5) for those standard microrganisms.
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN D-AMINO ACIDS ARENA II-29 D-Amino Acids and DAAO in Immunology and Therapeutics II-29 D-Amino Acids and their Role in Immunity II-29 Potential Therapeutic Role of D-Amino Acid Oxidase in Schizophrenia II-29 Study on In Situ Hybridization and Immunohistochemical Activity of DAAO: A Review II-29 Study on Immunoreactivity and Immunohistochemical Activity of d-Serine: A Review II-30 Observations and Inference II-30 DAAO in Leukocytes: Effective Treatment Against Certain Microrganisms II-30 D-Amino Acids in Biotechnology II-31 Application of Biotechnology to Enable Use of D-amino acid as N-source by Plants II-31 D-Amino Acid Oxidase (DAAO) Selectable Marker System II-31 Positive Selection II-32 Negative Selection II-32
In their winning team project, Linking Supercomputing and Systems Biology for Efficient Bioethanol Production, Scott Molony, Steven Arcangeli and Scott Horton contribute to a growing body of research on creating microrganisms that can produce alternative fuels.
Aquaculture is agriculture involving the controlled cultivation of aquatic plants, animals and microrganisms.