Midrash

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Mid·rash

 (mĭd′räsh′)
n. pl. Mid·rash·im (mĭd-rô′shĭm, mĭd′rä-shēm′)
Any of a group of Jewish commentaries on the Hebrew Scriptures compiled between ad 200 and 1200 and based on exegesis, parable, and haggadic legend.

[Hebrew midrāš, commentary, explanation, Midrash, from dāraš, to seek, study; see drš in Semitic roots.]

midrash

(ˈmɪdræʃ; Hebrew miˈdraʃ)
n, pl midrashim (mɪˈdrɔʃɪm; Hebrew midraˈʃim)
1. (Judaism) a homily on a scriptural passage derived by traditional Jewish exegetical methods and consisting usually of embellishment of the scriptural narrative
2. (Judaism) one of a number of collections of such homilies composed between 400 and 1200 ad
[C17: from Hebrew: commentary, from darash to search]
midrashic adj

mid•rash

(miˈdrɑʃ)

n., pl. mid•ra•shim (ˌmi drɑˈʃim)
mid•ra•shoth, mid•ra•shot (ˌmi drɑˈʃɔt)
1. an early Jewish interpretation of or commentary on a Biblical text.
2. (cap.) a collection of such commentaries, esp. those written in the first ten centuries A.D.
[1605–15; < Hebrew midrāsh literally, exposition]
mid•rash•ic (mɪdˈræʃ ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Midrash - (Judaism) an ancient commentary on part of the Hebrew scriptures that is based on Jewish methods of interpretation and attached to the biblical text
Judaism - the monotheistic religion of the Jews having its spiritual and ethical principles embodied chiefly in the Torah and in the Talmud
commentary, comment - a written explanation or criticism or illustration that is added to a book or other textual material; "he wrote an extended comment on the proposal"
References in periodicals archive ?
Jewish midrashim on Genesis 11 retain the general motif of the biblical text and read the story of the Tower of Babel as an etiology on how the different languages of the world evolved.
Tebat Marqua: A Collection of Samaritan Midrashim (Jerusalem: Academy of Sciences, 1988) p.
The topics include the reception of the Homeric poems in antiquity and modernity, the related principles of topos didaskalikos and anaphora in Aristarchus' commentaries, Philo and the allegorical interpretation of Homer in the Platonic tradition, the 26 books of the Hebrew Bible and the Alexandrian scribal methods, and designating dependence in rabbinic halakhic midrashim and Homeric scholarship.
The question of whether midrashim were meant to be understood literally or as parables divided rabbinic sages.
The midrashim written by rabbis of yore, which author Gerstein used in fashioning his version of the tale, paid a great deal of attention to the cute little ram.
She created midrashim, using the biblical text, ancient history, varied commentaries on Genesis, and her own feminine experience and creativity.
60) A variety of midrashim reflect the same concern when they stress Moses' personal limitations--his difficulty, for example, understanding certain matters "all of which God pointed out to him with His finger.
Second, the gaps that are addressed by the centuries of rabbinic readings, collected under the title midrashim, are especially effective for opening up textual discussion.
In successive chapters he discusses the exegetical debate between Justin Martyr and Trypho, the ideological contest between Jews and Christians in Genesis Rabbah, the contrast between the Dialogue with Trypho and the Mekhita, the Passover and Exodus themes in Origen and rabbinic midrashim, the Songs of Songs (mentioned above), and the Midrash on Ecclesiastes in comparison to Jerome's commentary.
In most midrashim there is a message which we can begin to uncover by asking: What idea does the midrashic text want to teach?
The study focuses on chapter two of Mishnah Sanhedrin, the halakhic midrashim, and passages in the Babylonian and Palestinian Talmud that revolve around this mishnah.
Midrashim of the ninth century speak of God's suffering over the Temple's destruction, but here too the Temple was no longer something to be rebuilt but rather a symbol of messianic salvation and eschatological renewal.