Milesian


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Related to Milesian: Miletus, Milesian school

Mi·le·sian 1

 (mī-lē′zhən, -shən)
adj.
Of or relating to Miletus or its inhabitants.
n.
A native or inhabitant of Miletus.

[From Latin Mīlēsius, from Greek Mīlēsios, from Mīlētos, Miletus.]

Mi·le·sian 2

 (mī-lē′zhən, -shən)
n.
1. Mythology A member of a people who invaded Ireland, defeated the Tu·a·tha Dé Da·naan, and became the ancestors of the Gaels.
2. A native or inhabitant of Ireland.
adj.
Of or relating to Ireland; Irish.

[After Milesius, Latinized form of Old Irish Míl Espáine, legendary ancestor of the Gaels (literally, "Soldier of Spain," since he fought and died in Spain) : míl, soldier (from Latin mīles) + Espáine, genitive of Espáin, Spain (from Latin Hispānia).]

Milesian

(maɪˈliːzɪən)
adj
(Historical Terms) of or relating to Miletus
n
(Historical Terms) an inhabitant of Miletus
[via Latin from Greek Milēsios]

Milesian

(maɪˈliːzɪən)
adj
(Peoples) Irish
n
(Peoples) an Irishman
[C16: from Milesius, a fictitious king of Spain whose sons were supposed to have conquered Ireland]

Mi•le•sian

(mɪˈli ʒən, -ʃən, maɪ-)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Miletus.
n.
2. a native or inhabitant of Miletus.
[1540–50; < Latin Mīlēsi(us) (< Greek Mīlḗsios) + -an1]
References in classic literature ?
And in my opinion this sort of writing and composition is of the same species as the fables they call the Milesian, nonsensical tales that aim solely at giving amusement and not instruction, exactly the opposite of the apologue fables which amuse and instruct at the same time.
Now occurred one of those chances which decide the fortunes of plants, as well as those of men, giving me a claim to Norman, instead of Milesian descent.
Or is there any invention of his, applicable to the arts or to human life, such as Thales the Milesian or Anacharsis the Scythian, and other ingenious men have conceived, which is attributed to him?
So again the Milesians, Herodotus tells us, were long troubled by civil discord, till they asked help from Paros, and the Parians sent ten commissioners who gave Miletus a new constitution.
For in snug darkness abideth the outlawed Milesian, and if in Galway it's for him you're looking, it's in the pubs on the Quay you'll find him, and nowhere else.
Seven of its eleven books concern a series of Milesian or ribald tales that take place in Thessaly, traditionally noted as a place of magic, and are presented by a narrator named Lucius with hermeneutic complexity.
The Neue Muzik this produced overwhelmed the orthodox traditions and shaped the politics, culture, and cult of the rich and enriching century that bridged the pregnant time from the Milesian philosophers to Plato and Aristotle.
But as Christina Morin emphasizes in discussing John Banim's The Boyne Water (1826) in relation to Maturin's The Milesian Chief (1812), Banim was writing on the other side of the great Protestant/Catholic divide.
With mid-Neolithic settlements dating from at least the sixth millennium BC (most notably Hamangia and Harsova), Dobrogea later became part of the ancient territory of the Thracian tribes (the Getae), while presenting sufficient attraction to Scythians and to Milesian and Heraclean colonists.
We are required to see him as the sole toga-bearer amongst hordes of weapon-bearing savages, the origins of Tomis as a Milesian colony with a strong Greek background totally suppressed.
I am very willing to buy into a consensus that Apuleius' Metamorphoses was produced in a form that would appeal to a large and varied constituency of readers and listeners, that it was 'sold' as a racy story in the Milesian mode, but that it could be received at a literary, intellectual and even philosophical level by those well up in the cultural hierarchy.
The work presents a discussion of Maturin's major works including The Wild Irish Boy, The Milesian Chief and his most famous work Melmoth the Wanderer.