minelayer

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mine·lay·er

 (mīn′lā′ər)
n.
A ship equipped for laying explosive underwater mines.

minelayer

(ˈmaɪnˌleɪə)
n
(Military) a warship or aircraft designed for the carrying and laying of mines

mine•lay•er

(ˈmaɪnˌleɪ ər)

n.
a naval ship equipped for laying mines in the water.
[1905–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.minelayer - ship equipped for laying marine minesminelayer - ship equipped for laying marine mines
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
Translations

minelayer

[ˈmaɪnˌleɪəʳ] Nminador m

minelayer

[ˈmaɪnˌleɪəʳ] nposamine m or f inv
References in periodicals archive ?
com; | Fast Minelayers Assn, Northern Section: Contact Jim Calcraft 01562 67822; | Federation of B'ham Ex-Service Assn: Meets first Sat of month at 11am at Menzies Strathallan Hotel, 225 Hagley Road, B16 9RY.
On May 9, 1940, while searching for German minelayers in the North Sea, she was torpedoed with the loss of 27 lives.
Four ice-capable Squadron 2020 vessels are being designed to replace the Finnish Rauma-class fast-attack missile boats and Hameenmaa-class minelayers which will reach the end of their life-cycle by the mid-2020s.
Four ice-capable Squadron 2020 vessels are designed to replace the Finnish Raumaclass fast-attack missile boats and Hameenmaa-class minelayers that will reach the end of their life-cycle by the mid-2020s
It included an aircraft carrier, three cruisers, two fast minelayers and 16 flotilla leaders and destroyers, not to mention a whole host of other vessels for the Royal and Merchant Navies.
6) While packages for mission sets beyond the baseline of MCM, surface warfare, and antisubmarine warfare (ASW) have been suggested for the littoral combat ship, there is no apparent interest in configuring LCS variants as minelayers.
The addition of low observable aircraft to the stable of potential standoff minelayers introduces two new capabilities to the mix.
During World War I, she escorted transatlantic convoys and then joined the British fleet to spend the war patrolling the North Sea for U-boats and protecting minelayers.
On April 6, she escorted destroyer minelayers as they sailed to implement Operation Wilfred, a plan to prevent the transport of Swedish iron ore from Narvik to Germany.
With many b&w photos and diagrams, and including cruise minelayers and escort and command cruisers of the 1960s and 1970s, he describes various classes, such as the Bristol, Dartmouth, Chatham, Birmingham, Calypso, Dido, and Emerald classes; the HMS Adelaide; the "Atlantic Cruiser"; and World War I rearmament, aircraft, anti-aircraft weapons, and experiences.