Mishnah

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Mish·nah

also Mish·na  (mĭsh′nə)
n. Judaism
1. The first section of the Talmud, being a collection of early oral interpretations of the scriptures as compiled about ad 200.
2. A paragraph from this section of the Talmud.
3. The teaching of a rabbi or other noted authority on Jewish laws.

[Mishnaic Hebrew mišnâ, repetition, instruction, from šānâ, to repeat; see ṯn in Semitic roots.]

Mish·na′ic (mĭsh-nā′ĭk) adj.

Mish•nah

or Mish•na

(ˈmɪʃ nə, mɪʃˈnɑ)

n., pl. Mish•na•yoth, Mish•na•yot (ˌmɪʃ nɑˈyɔt) Mish•nahs. Judaism.
1. the collection of oral laws compiled about a.d. 200 and forming the basic part of the Talmud.
2. an article or section of this collection.
[1600–10; < Medieval Hebrew mishnāh literally, teaching by oral repetition]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mishnah - the first part of the TalmudMishnah - the first part of the Talmud; a collection of early oral interpretations of the scriptures that was compiled about AD 200
Talmud - the collection of ancient rabbinic writings on Jewish law and tradition (the Mishna and the Gemara) that constitute the basis of religious authority in Orthodox Judaism
References in periodicals archive ?
It follows four friends at the finest of Jerusalem's yeshivot who care more about smoking, sipping Nespresso, and watching Van Damme films than about spending their days poring over mishnayot.
a chapter of the Pentateuch and a chapter of Mishnayot (a portion of the Oral Law).
The synagogue, according to JTA, was the "tiny" Chevra Lomdei Mishnayot synagogue in the infamous southern Polish town.
132) The teachings at the very beginning of the tractate, for example, Mishnayot Yevamot 1:1-4, all make mention of co-wives in their discussions of the family, as do many other Mishnayot and toseftas throughout the tractate.
Berkson looks at the individual sayings, or mishnayot, through the interpretations of the great Jewish commentators and also within the broader context of Western thought--through views found in the Bible, the ancient Greeks, the Enlightenment, Buddhism, Confucianism, and American culture today.