Missolonghi


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Missolonghi

(ˌmɪsəˈlɒŋɡɪ) or

Mesolonghi

n
(Placename) a town in W Greece, near the Gulf of Patras: famous for its defence against the Turks in 1822–23 and 1825–26 and for its association with Lord Byron, who died here in 1824. Pop (municipality): 18 354 (2001). Modern Greek name: Mesolóngion

Mis•so•lon•ghi

(ˌmɪs əˈlɔŋ gi)

n.
a town in W Greece, on the Gulf of Patras: Byron died here 1824. 10,164.
Greek, Mesolóngion.
References in classic literature ?
He sailed to the Greek camp at the malarial town of Missolonghi, where he showed qualities of leadership but died of fever after a few months, in 1824, before he had time to accomplish anything.
Contract award: hire 250 beds for student housing in western greece tei on site at missolonghi (210 beds) and nafpaktos (40 beds) for the academic years 2014-2015 and 2015-2016
1824: Poet Lord Byron died of a fever at Missolonghi while aiding Greek insurgents against the Turks in their fight for independence.
1824: Leading poet Lord Byron died of a fever at Missolonghi while aiding Greek insurgents against the Turks in their fight for independence.
On his earlier Mediterranean trip, Galt had undertaken various feats of speed-translation from Italian as a pastime--for instance, when confined indoors by wet weather in Missolonghi, or while in quarantine at Messina.
He makes Byron the hero of his opening section on the Greek-Ottoman war and comes around to Byron again at the end--not failing to note that he died in Missolonghi a casualty of fever not battle.
He fell ill and died in Missolonghi on 19 April 1824, and instantly became a hero of Greek history and an icon of the philhellenic movement in Europe.
Demakes, La presse Francaise face a la chute de Missolonghi et a la Bataille Navale de Navarin: Recherches sur les sources du Philhellenisme Francais.
His death at Missolonghi glamorized in perpetuity the glory of fighting and dying for a foreign cause.
WHEN LAWRENCE DURRELL MET HENRY MILLER in Patras on the eve of World War II, he was eager to fight for Greece in imitation of Byron, who had died across the water not too far away, in Missolonghi, during the war of independence in the 1820s.
Julius Millingen, the physician who attended Byron at Missolonghi, recorded that Byron asked, before losing consciousness for the last time: "Shall I sue for mercy?