Missouri


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Related to Missouri: Missouri Compromise

Mis·sou·ri 1

 (mĭ-zo͝or′ē)
n. pl. Missouri or Mis·sou·ris
1. A member of the Native American people formerly inhabiting north-central Missouri, with a present-day population living with the Oto in north-central Oklahoma.
2. The Siouan language of the Missouri.

[French, from Illinois ouemessourita, those that have dugout canoes.]

Mis·sou·ri 2

 (mĭ-zo͝or′ē, -zo͝or′ə)
Abbr. MO or Mo.
A state of the central United States. It was admitted as the 24th state in 1821. Under Spanish control from 1762 to 1800, the area passed to the United States through the Louisiana Purchase of 1803. Organized as a territory in 1812, Missouri's application for admission as a slaveholding state in 1817 sparked a bitter controversy over the question of extending slavery into new territories. The Missouri Compromise of 1820 provided for the admission of Maine as a free state and Missouri as a slave state in the following year. Jefferson City is the capital and St. Louis the largest city.

Mis·sou′ri·an adj. & n.

Missouri

(mɪˈzʊərɪ)
n
1. (Placename) a state of the central US: consists of rolling prairies in the north, the Ozark Mountains in the south, and part of the Mississippi flood plain in the southeast, with the Mississippi forming the E border; chief US producer of lead and barytes. Capital: Jefferson City. Pop: 5 704 484 (2003 est). Area: 178 699 sq km (68 995 sq miles). Abbreviation: Mo or MO (with zip code)
2. (Placename) a river in the W and central US, rising in SW Montana: flows north, east, and southeast to join the Mississippi above St Louis; the longest river in North America; chief tributary of the Mississippi. Length: 3970 km (2466 miles)

Mis•sour•i

(mɪˈzʊər i, -ˈzʊər ə)

n.
1. a state in the central United States. 5,595,211; 69,674 sq. mi. (180,455 sq. km). Cap.: Jefferson City. Abbr.: MO, Mo.
2. a river flowing from SW Montana into the Mississippi N of St. Louis, Mo. 2723 mi. (4382 km) long.
Mis•sour′i•an, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Missouri - a midwestern state in central United StatesMissouri - a midwestern state in central United States; a border state during the American Civil War, Missouri was admitted to the Confederacy without actually seceding from the Union
middle west, Midwest, midwestern United States - the north central region of the United States (sometimes called the heartland or the breadbasket of America)
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
Confederacy, Confederate States, Confederate States of America, Dixie, Dixieland, South - the southern states that seceded from the United States in 1861
Cape Girardeau - a town in southeast Missouri
Columbia - a university town in central Missouri
Hannibal - a town in northeast Missouri on the Mississippi River; boyhood home of Mark Twain
Independence - a city in western Missouri; the beginning of the Santa Fe Trail
capital of Missouri, Jefferson City - capital of the state of Missouri; located in central Missouri on the Missouri river
Kansas City - a city in western Missouri situated at the confluence of the Kansas River and the Missouri River; adjacent to Kansas City, Kansas
Poplar Bluff - a town in southeast Missouri
St. Joseph, Saint Joseph - a town in northwest Missouri on the Missouri River; in the 19th century it became the eastern terminus of the pony express
Gateway to the West, St. Louis, Saint Louis - the largest city in Missouri; a busy river port on the Mississippi River near its confluence with the Missouri River; was an important staging area for wagon trains westward in the 19th century
Sedalia - a town in east central Missouri
Springfield - a city of southwestern Missouri
Osage River, Osage - a river in Missouri that is a tributary of the Missouri River
Saint Francis River, St. Francis River, Saint Francis, St. Francis - a tributary of the Mississippi River that rises in Missouri and flows southeastward through Arkansas
White River, White - a tributary of the Mississippi River that flows southeastward through northern Arkansas and southern Missouri
2.Missouri - the longest river in the United StatesMissouri - the longest river in the United States; arises in Montana and flows southeastward to become a tributary of the Mississippi at Saint Louis; "The Missouri and Mississippi Rivers together form the third longest river in the world"
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
3.Missouri - a member of the Siouan people formerly inhabiting the valley of the Missouri river in Missouri
Siouan, Sioux - a member of a group of North American Indian peoples who spoke a Siouan language and who ranged from Lake Michigan to the Rocky Mountains
4.Missouri - a dialect of the Chiwere language spoken by the Missouri
Chiwere - the Siouan language spoken by the Iowa and Oto and Missouri
Translations
Missouri

Missouri

[mɪˈzʊərɪ] NMisuri m

Missouri

n (= state)Missouri nt
References in classic literature ?
I do not remember crossing the Missouri River, or anything about the long day's journey through Nebraska.
He lived in the world, as the last of the Grisly Bears lived in settled Missouri.
Comparing the humped herds of whales with the humped herds of buffalo, which, not forty years ago, overspread by tens of thousands the prairies of Illinois and Missouri, and shook their iron manes and scowled with their thunder-clotted brows upon the sites of populous river-capitals, where now the polite broker sells you land at a dollar an inch; in such a comparison an irresistible argument would seem furnished, to show that the hunted whale cannot now escape speedy extinction.
It was in the latter part of July, when Jurgis was in Missouri, that he came upon the harvest work.
Soon after, I went to see a panorama of the Mississippi, and as I worked my way up the river in the light of today, and saw the steamboats wooding up, counted the rising cities, gazed on the fresh ruins of Nauvoo, beheld the Indians moving west across the stream, and, as before I had looked up the Moselle, now looked up the Ohio and the Missouri and heard the legends of Dubuque and of Wenona's Cliff--still thinking more of the future than of the past or present--I saw that this was a Rhine stream of a different kind; that the foundations of castles were yet to be laid, and the famous bridges were yet to be thrown over the river; and I felt that THIS WAS THE HEROIC AGE ITSELF, though we know it not, for the hero is commonly the simplest and obscurest of men.
When I was a boy in a printing-office in Missouri, a loose-jointed, long-legged, tow-headed, jeans-clad countrified cub of about sixteen lounged in one day, and without removing his hands from the depths of his trousers pockets or taking off his faded ruin of a slouch hat, whose broken rim hung limp and ragged about his eyes and ears like a bug-eaten cabbage leaf, stared indifferently around, then leaned his hip against the editor's table, crossed his mighty brogans, aimed at a distant fly from a crevice in his upper teeth, laid him low, and said with composure:
When they got abreast the head of the island they quit shooting and dropped over to the Missouri shore and went home to the town.
The scene of this chronicle is the town of Dawson's Landing, on the Missouri side of the Mississippi, half a day's journey, per steamboat, below St.
As he drew near, he slackened speed, took the middle of the street, leaned far over to star- board and rounded to ponderously and with laborious pomp and circumstance -- for he was personating the Big Missouri, and considered himself to be drawing nine feet of water.
About night we landed at one of them little Missouri towns high up toward Iowa, and had supper at the tavern, and got a room upstairs with a cot and a double bed in it, but I dumped my bag under a deal table in the dark hall while we was moving along it to bed, single file, me last, and the landlord in the lead with a tallow candle.
Louis by the Eads bridge, through Kansas City, across the Missouri, along the corn-fields of Kansas, and then on--on--on with the Sante Fe Railway, across vast plains and past the brink of the Grand Canyon, to Pueblo and the lofty city of Denver.
But this did not disconcert the enthusiast, who proceeded with the story of Joseph Smith's bankruptcy in 1837, and how his ruined creditors gave him a coat of tar and feathers; his reappearance some years afterwards, more honourable and honoured than ever, at Independence, Missouri, the chief of a flourishing colony of three thousand disciples, and his pursuit thence by outraged Gentiles, and retirement into the Far West.

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