mitochondrial DNA


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Related to mitochondrial DNA: Mitochondrial disease

mitochondrial DNA

n. Abbr. mtDNA
DNA that is contained in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells and is inherited maternally.

mitochondrial DNA

n
(Genetics) DNA found in mitochondria, which contains some structural genes and is generally inherited only through the female line. Abbreviation: mtDNA
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Blood samples revealed participants had lower amounts of mitochondrial DNA with a higher amount of methylation than healthy people.
To conduct this research, the scientists collected skin cells from research subjects, mostly children and a few middle-aged men, with mitochondrial DNA mutations.
The technique, also known as mitochondrial donation, mitochondrial transfer, or mitochondrial DNA replacement, has generated significant controversy, with critics warning that it will lead to "germline enhancements," eugenics, and designer babies.
Mitochondrial DNA (mDNA) is only involved in metabolism and makes up just 0.
Its mother's faulty mitochondrial DNA - which act as power plants in cells and make up just 0.
These changes in the form of telomere shortening and alterations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), are important in the aging process, and this new research provides evidence that psychosocial factors--specifically childhood adversity and psychiatric disorders-- may also influence these cellular changes and could lead to accelerated aging.
Under the new rules, IVF clinics will be able to replace a baby's defective mitochondrial DNA with healthy DNA from a female donor's egg.
Mitochondrial DNA changes at a predictable rate, acting as an evolutionary clock that makes it ideal for such comparisons.
The service required is for the complete mitochondrial DNA sequencing of 14,000 independent human DNA samples.
Mitochondrial DNA only affects energy production, not all the characteristics that make a person a recognisable individual.
These changes are easy to identify because the mitochondrial DNA genome is so small--just 16,000 units--compared with the three billion units of the genome in the cell's nucleus.
The first group of papers discusses protocols used to study the transduction of information from mitochondrial DNA to functionally active respiratory complexes, covering investigations of the nucleoid proteome, mitochondrial DNA packaging, replication, transcription, respiratory complex synthesis, and polymerase gamma mutations associated with mitochondrial disorders.

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