mixotrophic

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mixotrophic

(ˌmɪksəˈtrəʊfɪk)
adj
(Biology) biology relating to a combination of heterotrophic and autotrophic sustenance
References in periodicals archive ?
Ken Furuya from Tokyo University spoke on eco-physiology of green Noctiluca Scintillans, a successful mixotroph.
An immediate advantage of being a mixotroph compared to the specialist autotrophs and heterotrophs is assumed to include a better survival of the mixotrophs during periods of nutrient or light limitation.
If the mixotroph has a higher affinity than the autotroph for mineral nutrients, the autotroph cannot compete in the system; more interesting, therefore, is the situation where mixotrophs are assumed to have the lowest affinity for mineral nutrients:
when the mixotroph has equal affinities for bacteria and for dissolved mineral nutrients.
The case is somewhat puzzling because what it means is that mixotrophy is so important in regulating the food web that the mixotroph must survive as an autotroph.
However, there is experimental evidence that another mixotroph (Dinobryon cylindricum) requires a very low abundance of bacteria to grow in the light, probably to obtain essential growth factors or major nutrients for photosynthetic growth (Caron et al.
This contrasts with results reported for a closely related mixotroph, Poterioochromonas malhamensis (Caron et al.
MacArthur 1955), and this seems also to hold for the mixotroph Ochromonas when it is compared to more specialized organisms.
The mixotroph is able to utilize substitutable resources (photosynthesis and bacterial ingestion as carbon sources, soluble reactive phosphorus and bacterial phosphorus as P sources), whereas the specialized organisms depend on only one of these respective C and P sources.
The mixotroph is able to cover its carbon-and energy demand both by bacterial ingestion and by photosynthesis.
Similar to the previous case, the ZNGI and the consumption vector for the mixotroph are based on the assumptions that both resources involved, bacterial phosphorus and SRP in this case, are substitutable and that they are taken up simultaneously [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED].
Any animal that consumes a mixotroph should therefore be an omnivore.