Mockage

Mock´age


n.1.Mockery.
References in periodicals archive ?
William Harrison in his 1587 Description of England says "for desire of novelty we oft exchange our finest cloth, corn, tin and wools for halfpenny cockhorses for children, dogs of wax or of cheese, two penny tabors, leaden swords, painted feathers, gewgaws for fools, dog tricks for dizzards, hawkshoods, and suchlike trumpery, whereby we reap just mockage and reproach in other countries.
Taylor makes clear that he undertook the project neither "in malice, or mockage of Master Benjamin Jonson" and praises Jonson "to whom I am so much obliged for many undeserved courtesies that I have received from him" (121).