modernist

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mod·ern·ism

 (mŏd′ər-nĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. Modern thought, character, or practice.
b. Sympathy with or conformity to modern ideas, practices, or standards.
2. A peculiarity of usage or style, as of a word or phrase, that is characteristic of modern times.
3. often Modernism The deliberate departure from tradition and the use of innovative forms of expression that distinguish many styles in the arts and literature of the 1900s.
4. often Modernism A Roman Catholic movement, officially condemned in 1907, that attempted to examine traditional belief according to contemporary philosophy, criticism, and historiography.

mod′ern·ist n.
mod′ern·is′tic adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.modernist - an artist who makes a deliberate break with previous stylesmodernist - an artist who makes a deliberate break with previous styles
artist, creative person - a person whose creative work shows sensitivity and imagination
Translations

modernist

[ˈmɒdənɪst]
A. ADJmodernista
B. Nmodernista mf

modernist

nModernist(in) m(f)
References in classic literature ?
The coach was a kind of commodious wagonette, invented by the modernist talent of the courier, who dominated the expedition with his scientific activity and breezy wit.
And where modernists typically deploy glass-window walls to promote visual extension in the horizontal dimension, Rudolph rotates the transparent picture plane ninety degrees.
It is true that certain architects of the previous century -- how strange those words ring for Modernists -- were creative forces that lasted for longer.
But Archigram differed from mainstream Modernists on one fundamental count that had far-reaching implications for their practice: they wholeheartedly embraced what many of their countercultural contemporaries shunned - postwar consumer culture.
He gave hope to the Modernists in the early days of the regime and encouraged both Mies and Gropius to contribute to the 1934 exhibition Deutsches Volk, Deutsche Arbeit run by the Nazi organisation 'Kraft durch Freude'.
Instead, they were looking for ways to include in their architecture the parts of the city that the Modernists forgot: places of friction and contradiction.
Unlike other English Modernists, his post-war design was of far higher quality than his pre-war.
The eclecticism is at a profound level, distinct from the film set borrowings of the Post-Modernists and in the tradition of architects such as lrving Gill who adapted the forms of the pueblo to Modernist expression.
So, how did Barnhisel's Cold War modernists square this circle?
Verlyn Flieger, for example, has suggested that, if Pound and Picasso represent artists who were "avowed modernists," at least Tolkien and his fellow Inklings may be viewed as "reluctant modernists.
The chapter highlights the most important departure modernism took from its predecessor--realism; realism presents the external world as objectively present, while for modernists the external world cannot be independent of the subjectivity of human beings.
After his introduction, Genter gives almost equal attention to high, romantic, and late modernism throughout his eight chapters because he defines his late modernists, as individuals and as a group, against the ideas and arguments of high and romantic modernists, respectively Genter argues that an otherwise "varied" group of high modernists including literary and cultural critics like Theodor Adorno, Lionel'Trilling, and Allen Tate prized the autonomous work of art, formalism, and orthodox Freudian psychology, inter alia (13).