mogul

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Related to Moghuls: Moguls

mo·gul 1

 (mō′gəl)
n.
1. A small hard mound of snow on a ski slope, cast up over numerous runs by the skis of skiers as they turn.
2. One of a set of closely spaced, artificially constructed mounds forming the course for certain competitive skiing events.
3. moguls(used with a sing. or pl. verb) A skiing event held on such a course.

[Alteration (probably influenced by mogul) of mid-20th century American skiers' jargon mugel, from Bavarian dialectal (Austria) Mugl, hillock; perhaps akin to Old English mūga, mow, haystack; see mow1.]

mo·gul 2

 (mō′gəl, mō-gŭl′)
n.
1. A very rich or powerful person; a magnate.
2. Mogul Variant of Mughal.

[Urdu muġal, muġul, Mughal; see Mughal.]

Mogul

(ˈməʊɡʌl; məʊˈɡʌl)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a member of the Muslim dynasty of Indian emperors established by Baber in 1526. See Great Mogul
2. (Islam) a Muslim Indian, Mongol, or Mongolian
3. (Peoples) a Muslim Indian, Mongol, or Mongolian
adj
(Historical Terms) of or relating to the Moguls or their empire
[C16: from Persian mughul Mongol]

mogul

(ˈməʊɡʌl; məʊˈɡʌl)
n
1. an important or powerful person
2. (Railways) a type of steam locomotive with a wheel arrangement of two leading wheels, six driving wheels, and no trailing wheels
[C18: from Mogul]

mogul

(ˈməʊɡəl)
n
(Skiing) a mound of hard snow on a ski slope
[C20: perhaps from South German dialect Mugl]

mo•gul

(ˈmoʊ gəl)

n.
a bump or mound of hard snow on a ski slope.
[1960–65; < dial. German; compare Austrian Mugel small hill]
mo′guled, adj.

Mo•gul

(ˈmoʊ gəl, -gʌl, moʊˈgʌl)

n.
1. a member of the dynasty of Muslim rulers that dominated N India and parts of the Deccan from the 16th to the early 18th centuries.
2. (l.c.) a powerful or influential person: a mogul of the movie industry.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to the Moguls or their empire.
[1580–90; < Persian mughul Mongol]

mogul

- A small mound of snow on a ski course, from Old Norse mugl, "little heap."
See also related terms for heap.

mogul

Snow mound usually formed by many skiers turning in the same place.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mogul - a bump on a ski slopemogul - a bump on a ski slope    
excrescence, extrusion, gibbosity, gibbousness, hump, jut, bulge, protrusion, protuberance, swelling, bump, prominence - something that bulges out or is protuberant or projects from its surroundings; "the gun in his pocket made an obvious bulge"; "the hump of a camel"; "he stood on the rocky prominence"; "the occipital protuberance was well developed"; "the bony excrescence between its horns"
2.mogul - a member of the Muslim dynasty that ruled India until 1857Mogul - a member of the Muslim dynasty that ruled India until 1857
ruler, swayer - a person who rules or commands; "swayer of the universe"
3.mogul - a very wealthy or powerful businessmanmogul - a very wealthy or powerful businessman; "an oil baron"
businessman, man of affairs - a person engaged in commercial or industrial business (especially an owner or executive)
oil tycoon - a powerful person in the oil business

mogul

noun tycoon, lord, baron, notable, magnate, big gun (informal), big shot (informal), personage, nob (slang, chiefly Brit.), potentate, big wheel (slang), big cheese (slang, old-fashioned), big noise (informal), big hitter (informal), heavy hitter (informal), nabob (informal), bashaw, V.I.P. an international media mogul
Translations
قُطْب من أقْطاب المال
magnát
=-mogulmogul
mogulipohatta
magnatmoghol
mogul
magnats
kralıpatron

mogul

[ˈməʊgəl] N
1. (Hist) → mo(n)gol(a) m/f
the Great Mogulel Gran Mogol
2. (fig) → magnate m
film mogulmagnate m de la cinematografía

mogul

[ˈməʊgʌl] n
(= powerful man) → nabab m
bosse f

mogul

1
n
(lit, fig)Mogul m
(Hist) Mogul emperorMogulkaiser m; Mogul empireMogulreich nt; Mogul invasionInvasion fdurch die Moguln; Mogul citymogulische Stadt

mogul

2
n (Ski) → Buckel m

mogul

[ˈməʊgl] n
a. (fig) → magnate m, pezzo grosso
b. (Skiing) → cunetta

mogul

(ˈməugl) noun
a very rich person who has great power or influence in a particular industry or activity. a movie mogul; a media mogul.
References in periodicals archive ?
Editors and media moghuls started pouring scorn on the people we used to call activists.
Remember when Pashtun king, Sher Shah Suri, defeated the Moghul emperor, Hamayun; the Pashtun thoughts they had regained the empire which was theirs by right as the Moghuls had usurped it from Pashtuns king, Ibrahim Lodhi.
More than the Moghuls, Shivaji faced stiff opposition from those belonging to the Maratha community.
The British made a brutal attempt to control much of India culminating in the fall of the Moghuls in 1857 and the destruction of their empire.
With the benefit of hindsight, it's easy to see the business sense behind the moves of both Pepsi and the TV moghuls from southern India.
108--cited in Percival Spear, Twilight of the Moghuls (Cambridge, 1951), p.
Please don't shout 'Moghal gardens' at me as, obviously, I have given this particular horticultural style some in-depth thought and concluded that, as the Moghuls were basically - give or take a bit of cross cultural dash here and there - Persian invaders, the magnificent, lavishly ornamented and meticulously laid out extravaganzas they were inspired to surround themselves with, were distinctly Persian not sub-continental Asian.
As well as his food-to-go, he serves Indian style breakfasts which can include anything from a traditional egg curry from his home region of Kerala to the Aurangabad toasties included here, a kind of curried potato burger said to have been enjoyed by Moghuls in Mumbai.
The Greeks, Persians, Mauryans, Moghuls, Kushans, Huns, Sassanids, Arabs, Mongols, British, Soviets, and now, Americans and our partners confronted the challenges of establishing acceptable governance and security in a place where geography, terrain, borders, and tribal ways in warfare combine to create an ideal venue for guerrillas and an exceedingly difficult one for those seeking to defeat them.
The Moghuls not only excelled in the arts, culture, poetry and literature but also in India left a far-reaching effect on history in the admiration of food and wine.