Moloch

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Mo·loch

 (mō′lŏk′, mŏl′ək) also Mo·lech (mō′lĕk′, mŏl′ək)
n.
1. In the Bible, the god of the Canaanites and Phoenicians to whom children were sacrificed.
2. Something possessing the power to exact severe sacrifice.

[Late Latin Moloch, from Greek Molokh, from Hebrew Mōlek, of Canaanite origin; see mlk in Semitic roots.]

mo·loch

 (mō′lŏk′, mŏl′ək)
[New Latin Moloch, thorny devil genus name, from Late Latin Moloch, the deity Moloch; see Moloch.]

moloch

(ˈməʊlɒk)
n
(Animals) a spiny Australian desert-living lizard, Moloch horridus, that feeds on ants: family Agamidae (agamas). Also called: mountain devil or spiny lizard

Moloch

(ˈməʊlɒk) or

Molech

n
(Bible) Old Testament a Semitic deity to whom parents sacrificed their children

Mo•loch

(ˈmoʊ lɒk, ˈmɒl ək)

n.
1. a deity who was propitiated by the sacrificial burning of children. II Kings 23:10, Jer. 32:35.
2. (l.c.) a spiny lizard, Moloch horridus, of Australian deserts.
[< Late Latin < Greek Móloch < Hebrew Mōlekh, alter. of melekh king]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Moloch - a tyrannical power to be propitiated by human subservience or sacrificeMoloch - a tyrannical power to be propitiated by human subservience or sacrifice; "the great Moloch of war"; "duty has become the Moloch of modern life"- Norman Douglas
power, force - one possessing or exercising power or influence or authority; "the mysterious presence of an evil power"; "may the force be with you"; "the forces of evil"
2.Moloch - god of the Canaanites and Phoenicians to whom parents sacrificed their childrenMoloch - god of the Canaanites and Phoenicians to whom parents sacrificed their children
3.Moloch - any lizard of the genus Molochmoloch - any lizard of the genus Moloch  
agamid, agamid lizard - a lizard of the family Agamidae
genus Moloch - genus of Australian desert lizard
Moloch horridus, spiny lizard, mountain devil - desert lizard that feeds on ants
Translations

Moloch

nMoloch m
References in periodicals archive ?
The connection woven between the deaths of Nadab and Abihu, the child sacrifice ritual of Molekh, and the forbidden sexual relations is intriguing and provides the reader with a timeless message about passion and how it should be channeled.