Molière

(redirected from Molier)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

Mo·lière

 (mōl-yâr′) Pen name of Jean Baptiste Poquelin. 1622-1673.
French playwright whose sophisticated comedies include Tartuffe (1664), The Misanthrope (1666), and The Bourgeois Gentleman (1670).

Molière

(French mɔljɛr)
n
(Biography) real name Jean-Baptiste Poquelin. 1622–73, French dramatist, regarded as the greatest French writer of comedy. His works include Tartuffe (1664), Le Misanthrope (1666), L'Avare (1668), Le Bourgeois gentilhomme (1670), and Le Malade imaginaire (1673)

Mo•lière

(moʊlˈyɛər)

n. (Jean Baptiste Poquelin)
1622–73, French playwright.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Moliere - French author of sophisticated comedies (1622-1673)Moliere - French author of sophisticated comedies (1622-1673)
References in periodicals archive ?
Actualmente, los movimientos migratorios la han diseminado desde las regiones endemicas hasta Canada y varios paises europeos (Slot, Hogema, Molier, Bart, & Zaaijer, 2016), en los cuales la WHO (2015) ha calculado entre seis y siete millones de personas infectadas.
Slot E, Hogema BM, Riezebos-Brilman A, Kok TM, Molier M, Zaaijer HL.
As Gelijn Molier puts it, "the American-British attack on Iraq shows how easy the doctrine of humanitarian intervention can be abused.
4) The US's invocation of RtoP as one of its justifications for its intervention in (or--as scholars like Gelijn Molier (5) put it--invasion of) Iraq in 2003 did not help to ease the suspicion that RtoP could be a "Trojan Horse" for Western states to interfere in the domestic affairs of weaker states.
Masse R, Molier J, Morin M, Chameaud J, Bredon P, Lafuma J.
in PEACE, SECURITY AND DEVELOPMENT IN AN ERA OF GLOBALIZATION: THE INTEGRATED SECURITY APPROACH VIEWED FROM A MULTIDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVE 317, 317-18 (Gelijin Molier & Eva Nieuwenhuys eds.
comprehensively traces the trajectory of liberal thought, provocatively contending that John Rawls and Susan Molier Okin effectively destroy the family by robbing it of its natural bonds, ceding its proper authority to the state, and reducing it to a group of individuals seeking their own individual goods (74-82).