Mollweide projection


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Related to Mollweide projection: Eckert projection

Mollweide projection

(ˈmɒlˌvaɪdə)
n
(Physical Geography) an equal-area map projection with the parallels and the central meridian being straight lines and the other meridians curved. It is often used to show world distributions of various phenomena
[C19: named after Karl B. Mollweide (1774–1825), German mathematician and astronomer]
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, Goode (1925) combined the Sanson sinusoidal and the Mollweide projection at 40[degrees] 44' 12"; north and south latitude, which is the latitude of equal scale.
An example of this is shown in Figure 1c, in which the Mollweide projection was created as a reprojection from the Lambert Azimuthal in Figure 1a.
He developed his second projection, Winkel II, in 1918 by averaging the cylindrical equidistant projection and the Mollweide projection.
The Mollweide projection shows minimum distortion at approximately 40 degrees north and south of the equator, where the projection is true to scale.
Imagine) and some original programming for the Goode homolosine projection (unavailable in commercial software at the time of this research), the 12 quadrilaterals were projected to four global projections using a standard parallel and central meridian of zero degrees: Lambert's equal-area cylindrical, Mollweide, Robinson, and the Goode homolosine (which is a combination of the sinusoidal projection at latitudes below 40 [degrees] 40' and the Mollweide projection at higher latitudes) interrupted by oceans.
Winkel took a similar approach in 1918 to create his second projection, Winkel II; he averaged the cylindrical equidistant projection and the Mollweide projection (Figure 5B).