monetarism

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mon·e·ta·rism

 (mŏn′ĭ-tə-rĭz′əm, mŭn′-)
n.
1. A theory holding that economic variations within a given system, such as changing rates of inflation, are most often caused by increases or decreases in the money supply.
2. A policy that seeks to regulate an economy by altering the domestic money supply, especially by increasing it in a moderate but steady manner.

mon′e·ta·rist adj. & n.

monetarism

(ˈmʌnɪtəˌrɪzəm)
n
1. (Economics) the theory that inflation is caused by an excess quantity of money in an economy
2. (Economics) an economic policy based on this theory and on a belief in the efficiency of free market forces, that gives priority to achieving price stability by monetary control, balanced budgets, etc, and maintains that unemployment results from excessive real wage rates and cannot be controlled by Keynesian demand management
ˈmonetarist n, adj

mon•e•ta•rism

(ˈmɒn ɪ təˌrɪz əm, ˈmʌn-)

n.
a doctrine holding that changes in the money supply determine the direction of a nation's economy.
[1965–70, Amer.]
mon′e•ta•rist, n., adj.

monetarism

1. an economic theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money.
2. the principle put forward by American economist Milton Friedman that control of the money supply and, thereby, of rate in the supply of credit serves to control inflation and recession while fostering prosperity. — monetarist, n., adj.
See also: Economics
an economie theory maintaining that stability and growth in the economy are dependent on a steady growth rate in the supply of money. — monetarist, n., adj.
See also: Money

monetarism

An economic policy based on controlling a country’s money supply.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monetarism - an economic theory holding that variations in unemployment and the rate of inflation are usually caused by changes in the supply of moneymonetarism - an economic theory holding that variations in unemployment and the rate of inflation are usually caused by changes in the supply of money
economic theory - (economics) a theory of commercial activities (such as the production and consumption of goods)
Translations
monetarizam
monetaryzm

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪzəm] Nmonetarismo m

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtərɪzəm] nmonétarisme m

monetarism

nMonetarismus m

monetarism

[ˈmʌnɪtˌrɪzm] nmonetarismo
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In my discussion I will focus on the question of why researchers doing empirical monetary economics should care about the details of how monetary aggregates are measured and how those measurements have changed over time.
The differing approaches and conclusions of the authors reflect evolving divergences in methodologies and outlooks that characterize the profession of monetary economics but simultaneously nudge it onto future avenues of research.
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Long before the talking heads argued monetary economics on Sunday morning television, philosophers and economists have debated about the relationships amongst and between incomes, prices and changes in the money supply, or even if such relationships exist.
He was widely regarded as the leader of the Chicago School of monetary economics, which stresses the importance of the quantity of money as an instrument of government policy and as a determinant of business cycles and inflation.
The activities and research of the NBER's Program in Monetary Economics over the last several years have been dominated by the financial and macroeconomic crisis that began in 2007 and erupted in full force in the fall of 2008.
He was educated at the London School of Economics ("LSE"), before working at Her Majesty's Treasury, and later returning to the LSE to lecture on monetary economics in 1964.
Shiller is the Sterling Professor of Economics at Yale University, a Research Associate in the NBER's AP, EFG, and Monetary Economics programs, and the co-director of the NBER's Behavioral Economics working group.
His research related to risk management and derivatives has been published in numerous scholarly journals including the Journal of Financial Economics, Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, and Journal of Monetary Economics.
James Stock, formerly a Research Associate in the NBER's Programs on Monetary Economics, Economic Fluctuations and Growth, and Asset Pricing, has also been appointed to the CEA.
of Ohio) has selected 41 papers published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics, Journal of Monetary Economics, Journal of International Money and Finance, and similar publications between 1950 and 2003.
economic cards, Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan's public comments about low inflation have been "a preemptive move" against overreaction in an already-skittish stock market, said an MIT Sloan expert on monetary economics.