monoglyceride

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monoglyceride

(ˌmɒnəʊˈɡlɪsəˈraɪd)
n
(Chemistry) a glycerol ester in which only one hydroxyl group is esterified
References in periodicals archive ?
Some lipids and monoglycerides have conformations as bicontinious cubic phases, especially as isotropic bulk gels, which are composed of surfactants with proper hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity balance and can stand in equilibrium with excessive water and be dispersed into cubic nanoparticles (CNPs).
Even though, this study did not determine the fatty acid content, it can be replaced by crude fat, as it is also known as the ether extract or the free lipid content, the lipid materials may include triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides, phospholipids, steroids, and free fatty acids (Association of American Feed Control Officials [AAFCO], 2014).
As the food enters the small intestine, enzymes break down the carbohydrates into sugars, the proteins into amino acids and the fats into fatty acids, glycerol and monoglycerides.
Dietary restriction of long-chain triglycerides (LCT) avoids their conversion into monoglycerides and free fatty acids (FFA), which are transported as chylomicrons to the intestinal lymph ducts.
Simple lipids are those which yield one or two hydrolysis products per molecule namely, tri- di- and monoglycerides, free and esterified cholesterol and free fatty acids [38,39].
The NaOH, KOH or Meth-oxides are the most common catalysts which convert the triglycerides into di-glycerides, monoglycerides and glycerol.
Knowing that monoglycerides and enzymes could be animal-derived and calcium stearoyl lactylate could be animal- and/or dairy-derived, The VRG called White Castle specifically about these ingredients.
It is now generally accepted that the antimicrobial activity, and especially anti-viral activity, in the body appears to be dependent on the digestion of triglycerides into monoglycerides and fatty acids such as the digestion of lauric acid to monolaurin.
That is, conversion of triglycerides to diglycerides, followed by the conversion of diglycerides to monoglycerides.
However, majority of the lipases are capable of converting triglycerides, diglycerides, monoglycerides and free fatty acids to fatty acid ethyl esters in addition to fat hydrolysis (1,4).
Lipases are natural hydrolases that can hydrolyze triglycerides into diglycerides, monoglycerides, fatty acids, and glycerol.
Upon secretion, triglycerides and esters get broken down by lipase enzymes and converted into triglycerides, monoglycerides and free fatty acids.