monologue

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mon·o·logue

also mon·o·log  (mŏn′ə-lôg′, -lŏg′)
n.
1.
a. A lengthy, uninterrupted speech by a single character, as in a play or novel.
b. A literary composition in monologue form.
2. A continuous series of jokes or comic stories delivered by one comedian.
3. A long speech made by one person, often monopolizing a conversation.
v. mon·o·logued, mon·o·logu·ing, mon·o·logues also mon·o·logged or mon·o·log·ging or mon·o·logs
v.intr.
To give or perform a monologue.
v.tr.
To address a monologue to.

[French : Greek mono-, mono- + Greek -logos, -logue.]

mon′o·log′ic (-lŏj′ĭk), mon′o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
mon′o·logu′ist (mŏn′ə-lôg′ĭst, -lŏg′-), mo·nol′o·gist (mə-nŏl′ə-jĭst, mŏn′ə-lôg′ĭst, -lŏg′-) n.

monologue

(ˈmɒnəˌlɒɡ) or

monolog

n
1. (Theatre) a long speech made by one actor in a play, film, etc, esp when alone
2. (Theatre) a dramatic piece for a single performer
3. any long speech by one person, esp when interfering with conversation
[C17: via French from Greek monologos speaking alone]
monologic, ˌmonoˈlogical adj
monologist n
monology n
Usage: See at soliloquy

mon•o•logue

or mon•o•log

(ˈmɒn əˌlɔg, -ˌlɒg)

n.
1.
a. a dramatic or comic piece spoken entirely by a single performer.
2. a prolonged talk or discourse by a single speaker.
3. any composition, as a poem, in which a single person speaks alone.
[1615–25; < French, on the model of dialogue dialogue; compare Greek monólogos speaking alone]
mon•o•log•ist (ˈmɒn əˌlɔ gɪst, -ˌlɒg ɪst, məˈnɒl ə dʒɪst) mon•o•logu•ist (ˈmɒn əˌlɔ gɪst, -ˌlɒg ɪst) n.

monologue

a theatrical performance or scene with a single actor who speaks alone.
See also: Self
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monologue - speech you make to yourselfmonologue - speech you make to yourself    
speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, voice communication, oral communication, speech, language - (language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"
2.monologue - a long utterance by one person (especially one that prevents others from participating in the conversation)monologue - a long utterance by one person (especially one that prevents others from participating in the conversation)
speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, voice communication, oral communication, speech, language - (language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"
3.monologue - a (usually long) dramatic speech by a single actormonologue - a (usually long) dramatic speech by a single actor
actor's line, words, speech - words making up the dialogue of a play; "the actor forgot his speech"

monologue

noun speech, lecture, sermon, harangue, soliloquy, oration, spiel (informal) He ignored the question and continued his monologue. see soliloquy
Translations
مونولوج: مُناجاة المَرء لِنَفْسِه
monolog
monolog
monologiyksinpuhelu
monológ
eintal; einræîa
漫談独白落語
monologas
monologs
monológ
monologtek kişili konuşma

monologue

[ˈmɒnəlɒg] monolog (US) Nmonólogo m

monologue

[ˈmɒnəlɒg] nmonologue m

monologue

, (US) monolog
nMonolog m

monologue

[ˈmɒnəlɒg] nmonologo

monologue

(ˈmonəlog) noun
a long speech by one person eg in a film, play etc.
References in classic literature ?
But in spite of the dramatic rudeness which is sometimes of the idiosyncrasy, the true and native colour of his multitudinous dramatis personae, or monologists, Mr.
Unlike the canonical monologists, whose linguistic power is confirmed both by the auditor's silence and the auditor's response, Jeanne's power and authority here are directly undercut by the soldiers' refusal to respond, just as, in the next verse paragraph, they are undermined by the soldiers' compliance.
Following this luminous understanding of interality, when requested to speak at the NCA panel, Giner extemporized from his notes in a performative style derived from Puerto Rican folkloric mountain singers, and based on the oratorical mode of the classic bululus of the Spanish Golden Age (itinerant monologists of the late 16th and 17th centuries).
Table 1 presents an analysis of function word use by male and female monologists in As I Lay Dying that shows that in 12 out of 14 measures, Faulkner's representation of male and female speech matches realworld patterns.
It encompasses everything from people inspired by music hall monologists (Think "Albert and the Lion") to hip hop inspired youngsters to punk, beat poetry, the ranting traditions of miners and the between the songs patter of folk musicians.
Handman also had a keen eye for monologists, like Eric Bogosian and John Leguizamo (who supplies the brief foreword to this book).
These were not monologists or actors but energetic comic artists who could portray multiple characters and score in quick bits.
McKay's monologists speak out of a conviction not only that accommodation with the colonizer is unavoidable in early-twentieth century Jamaica, but also that such accommodation can actually advance cultural and political critique.
Indeed, Bellow's monologists usually share many of their creator's views, traits, and personal experiences.
Stand-up comedy derived from various popular modes of entertainment of the late nineteenth-century, such as vaudeville, music halls, minstrel shows, humorous monologists (e.
People who seem to be talking to themselves in public are an increasingly common phenomenon, but most of us recognize that these monologists are in fact talking to someone else on a cell phone.
Vaudeville hosted an unlimited spectrum of talent: singers, comedians, dancers, jugglers, trained animals, tumblers, sleight-of-hand artists, magicians, thespians, bicyclists, wire walkers, mimes, hypnotists, ventriloquists, monologists, and song-and-dance men.