Monsieur


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Mon·sieur

 (mə-syœ′)
n. pl. Mes·sieurs (mā-syœ′, mĕs′ərz)
1. Abbr. M Used as a courtesy title before the surname, full name, or professional title of a man in a French-speaking area: Monsieur Cartier; Monsieur Jacques Cartier.
2. monsieur Used as a form of polite address for a man in a French-speaking area.

[French, from Old French : mon, my (from Latin meum, accusative of meus; see me- in Indo-European roots) + sieur, lord, sir (from Vulgar Latin *seiorem, accusative of *seior; see sire).]

monsieur

(French məsjø; English məsˈjɜː)
n, pl messieurs (French mesjø; English ˈmɛsəz)
a French title of address equivalent to sir when used alone or Mr when placed before a name
[literally: my lord]

mon•sieur

(məˈsyœ)

n., pl. mes•sieurs (mɛˈsyœ)
the conventional French title of respect and term of address for a man, corresponding to Mr. or sir.
[1490–1500; < French: literally, my lord; see sire]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.monsieur - used as a French courtesy titleMonsieur - used as a French courtesy title; equivalent to English `Mr'
adult male, man - an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman); "there were two women and six men on the bus"
References in classic literature ?
They laughed and chatted all the way home, and little Baptist, up behind, thought that monsieur and madamoiselle were in charming spirits.
Never would Edna Pontellier forget the shock with which she heard Madame Ratignolle relating to old Monsieur Farival the harrowing story of one of her accouchements, withholding no intimate detail.
For the customary attentions of your Marquis of Montcalm--I warrant me, Duncan, that he of Lothian would buy a dozen such marquisates--but if the news of the letter were bad, the gentility of this French monsieur would certainly compel him to let us know it.
He says, Monsieur, said the Guernsey-man, in French, turning to his captain, that only yesterday his ship spoke a vessel, whose captain and chief-mate, with six sailors, had all died of a fever caught from a blasted whale they had brought alongside.
If I get 'em, I'll soon have their airs out of them; they'll soon find that they've another kind of master to deal with than Monsieur St.
Rochester; then she coined pretexts to go downstairs, in order, as I shrewdly suspected, to visit the library, where I knew she was not wanted; then, when I got a little angry, and made her sit still, she continued to talk incessantly of her "ami, Monsieur Edouard Fairfax DE Rochester," as she dubbed him (I had not before heard his prenomens), and to conjecture what presents he had brought her: for it appears he had intimated the night before, that when his luggage came from Millcote, there would be found amongst it a little box in whose contents she had an interest.
Like Monsieur Manette, your father, the gentleman was of Beauvais.
Mynheer Calf, too, becomes Monsieur de Veau in the like manner; he is Saxon when he requires tendance, and takes a Norman name when he becomes matter of enjoyment.
The next day, Mademoiselle Cormon, packed into the old carriole with Josette, and looking like a pyramid on a vast sea of parcels, drove up the rue Saint-Blaise on her way to Prebaudet, where she was overtaken by an event which hurried on her marriage,--an event entirely unlooked for by either Madame Granson, du Bousquier, Monsieur de Valois, or Mademoiselle Cormon himself.
Do you fancy because you have heard Monsieur de Treville speak to us a little cavalierly today that other people are to treat us as he speaks to us?
he asked with his flattering manner; "that Monsieur de Beaufort had escaped, were you not?
Towards the middle of the month of May, in the year 1660, at nine o'clock in the morning, when the sun, already high in the heavens, was fast absorbing the dew from the ramparts of the castle of Blois a little cavalcade, composed of three men and two pages, re-entered the city by the bridge, without producing any other effect upon the passengers of the quay beyond a first movement of the hand to the head, as a salute, and a second movement of the tongue to express, in the purest French then spoken in France: "There is Monsieur returning from hunting.