Montague


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Mon•ta•gue

(ˈmɒn təˌgyu)

n.
(in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet) the family name of Romeo. Compare Capulet.
References in classic literature ?
An envoy of the Duke of Buckingham, named Montague, was taken, and proof was obtained of a league between the German Empire, Spain, England, and Lorraine.
Montague Lady Hunstanton, Miss Rose Leclercq Lady Caroline Pontefract, Miss Le Thiere Lady Stutfield, Miss Blanche Horlock Mrs.
No doubt--yet one needn't be always fifteen, as Lady Wortley Montague said," muttered the other, giving up the point, and changing her seat, in order that she might speak her mind more freely into the ear of a congenial spirit.
Lady Wortley Montague = Lady Mary Wortley Montague (1689-
It was dated from Montague Place upon the preceding evening, and ran thus:
When I first came up to London I had rooms in Montague Street, just round the corner from the British Museum, and there I waited, filling in my too abundant leisure time by studying all those branches of science which might make me more efficient.
For four years I had seen nothing of him until one morning he walked into my room in Montague Street.
The play was "The Shaughraun," with Dion Boucicault in the title role and Harry Montague and Ada Dyas as the lovers.
It was that in which Harry Montague, after a sad, almost monosyllabic scene of parting with Miss Dyas, bade her good-bye, and turned to go.
De Borhunte was up in the east, and Sir John de Montague in the west.
In the meantime original work of a high order was being produced both in England and America by such writers as Bradley, Stout, Bertrand Russell, Baldwin, Urban, Montague, and others, and a new interest in foreign works, German, French and Italian, which had either become classical or were attracting public attention, had developed.
Summoning the cab of most promising appearance, he directed the driver to repair to Montague Place, Russell Square.