Montanism


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Related to Montanism: Monarchianism, Donatism

Montanism

the 2nd-century doctrines of Montanus of Phrygia, who believed that the Holy Spirit, or Paraclete, dwelt within him and made him its instrument for guiding men in the Christian way. Cf. Tertullianism. — Montanist, n.
See also: Heresy
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Montanism was a denial of the divine nature of the Church.
The Catholic Church does not list him as a Doctor of the Church due to his later acceptance of the heresy of Montanism.
This, in a nutshell, is the argument of Kelly's monograph, which dedicates a chapter to each of five heresies and their contexts: Montanism in the early church, Monophysitism in the age of the christological councils, Catharism in the Middle Ages, Modernism in late-19th- and early-20th-century Roman Catholicism, and analogous forms of Modernism in Protestantism.
reaction against Montanism and its prophetic excesses, the growth of an
is believed to be constructed to provide access to the ancient Phrygian town of Pepuza, which was believed to be the headquarters of Montanism.
There are four topics covered in these early sections: martyrdom and virginity in the first and second century, aberrant movements (Encratism, Montanism, Neoplatonism, and Gnosticism), Clement of Alexandria, and Origen.
Among the topics are the outbreak of Montanism, the meaning of witness in the Apocalypse, martyrdom as a gift, and the hagiographic dossier of a saint.
Tabbernee, William, Fake Prophecy and Polluted Sacraments: Ecclesiastical and Imperial Reactions to Montanism.
Montanism appealed to Tertullian's zealous moral and ascetic rigorism and his antagonism towards secular culture.
Having edited the definitive collection of inscriptions and testimonia regarding Montanism and having published several important studies, William Tabbernee is well established as the dean in this area.
The degree to which Tertullian's increasingly sectarian attitudes were attributable to Montanism remains speculative, even when it is worth noting and certainly plausible.
Known for its belief in total equality of the sexes and reliance on prophetic utterings by its members, Montanism was centered for four hundred years in the towns of Pepouza and Tymion, now in modern western Turkey.