Montenegro

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Montenegro

Mon·te·neg·ro

 (mŏn′tə-nĕg′rō, -nē′grō)
A country of the western Balkan Peninsula bordering on the Adriatic Sea. An ancient Balkan state, it was at various times under Ottoman Muslim and theocratic Christian rule before becoming an independent kingdom (1910-1918). Montenegro then joined the newly formed Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, which became Yugoslavia after 1929. In 1991, four of the six Yugoslav republics declared independence, leaving Montenegro and Serbia as the sole constituents of a reorganized federal republic. Yugoslavia changed its name to Serbia and Montenegro in 2003 and dissolved the union altogether in 2006. Podgorica is the capital and largest city.

Montenegro

(ˌmɒntɪˈniːɡrəʊ)
n
(Placename) a republic in S central Europe, bordering on the Adriatic; declared a kingdom in 1910 and united with Serbia, Croatia, and other territories in 1918 to form Yugoslavia; remained united with Serbia as the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia when the other Yugoslav constituent republics became independent in 1991–92; Union of Serbia and Montenegro formed in 2003 and dissolved 2006. Mainly mountainous. Language: Serbian (Montenegrin). Religion: Orthodox Christian majority. Currency: euro. Capital: Podgorica. Pop: 653 474 (2013 est). Area: 13 812 sq km (5387 sq miles)

Mon•te•ne•gro

(ˌmɒn təˈni groʊ, -ˈnɛg roʊ)

n.
a constituent republic of Yugoslavia, in the SW part. 615,267; 5333 sq. mi. (13,812 sq. km). Cap.: Podgorica.
Mon`te•ne′grin (-ˈni grɪn, -ˈnɛg rɪn) adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Montenegro - a former country bordering on the Adriatic SeaMontenegro - a former country bordering on the Adriatic Sea; now part of the Union of Serbia and Montenegro
Federal Republic of Yugoslavia, Jugoslavija, Serbia and Montenegro, Union of Serbia and Montenegro, Yugoslavia - a mountainous republic in southeastern Europe bordering on the Adriatic Sea; formed from two of the six republics that made up Yugoslavia until 1992; Serbia and Montenegro were known as the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia until 2003 when they adopted the name of the Union of Serbia and Montenegro
Translations
Montenegro

Montenegro

[mɔntəˈniːgrəʊ] NMontenegro m

Montenegro

nMontenegro nt
References in classic literature ?
She knew all the statesmen of that region, Turks, Bulgarians, Montenegrins, Roumanians, Greeks, Armenians, and nondescripts, young and old, the living and the dead.
Police estimate that 15 local gangs are involved in international drug smuggling, and have noted increased involvement of Montenegrins in organized criminal groups abroad.
We are busily assisting the Montenegrins with building their institutions and strengthening the rule of law.
Almost 2,000 police guarded the 150 Montenegrins who successfully staged their country's first gay pride march in Podgorica.
He said we don't care about the shirt whereas Montenegrins throw themselves into everything.
In particular, he stressed that as a man of Montenegrin roots will be in the future committed to protecting and strengthening the national identity of Montenegrins in Argentina as a bridge of cooperation between the two countries.
On the occasion of 21 May, Montenegro's Independence Day, the Embassy of Montenegro, the Community of Montenegrins in the Republic of Macedonia and the Macedonian-Montenegrin Friendship Society organized the event "Days of Montenegrin Culture in the Republic of Macedonia" from 8 to 21 May.
Montenegrins: Montenegrins started voting Sunday in early elections called by the ruling centre-left coalition to try and win a new mandate as the tiny Balkan nation starts European Union entry talks.
It is obvious that Montenegrins have invested a lot in this relationship, hoping that Turkey, with special historical and cultural ties to this Balkan country going back to the 14th century, may help lift up the economy of Montenegro while providing a political boost to Montenegrins for reconciliation domestically and recognition globally.
Croatians and Montenegrins also earn higher salaries than Serbians.
But the Montenegrins pointed out there had been no ethnic cleansing on their territory.