mood disorder

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Related to Mood disorders: Anxiety disorders, Personality disorders

mood disorder

n.
Any of a group of psychiatric disorders, including depression and bipolar disorder, characterized by a pervasive disturbance of mood. Also called affective disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Addressing sleep problems should be a priority for people struggling with these mood disorders.
Dr Glick's research focuses on schizophrenia and mood disorders.
The following are examples of neurobiologic, clinical, and treatment commonalities across those psychotic and mood disorders.
The mothers were asked if they had any symptoms of postpartum mood disorders and if they told a doctor, nurse, lactation consultant or doula about the symptoms.
Scientists found that men who consumed more than 67 grams of sugar per day increased their risk of mood disorders by more than a fifth compared with those with an intake of less than 39.
The evidence that marijuana causes mood disorders is just a theory at this point, Conroy said.
A large Scottish study published in the journal Hypertension has shown that some blood pressure drugs (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists) carry twice the risk of patients being admitted to hospital for mood disorders.
As such, it is our hope that this inclusive and comprehensive approach to tracking and understanding mood disorders will enable our clinical teams to better assess and understand the disease state and ultimately improve real-world outcomes for millions of patients.
The crippling effects of both kinds of mood disorders are described accurately, and the process of getting help through hospitalization, evaluation, proper medication, therapy and treatment is explained.
This statement makes recommendations to consider these mood disorders as independent, moderate risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and is based on a group of recent scientific studies including those that reported cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks and deaths among young people.
The work has implications for researchers and clinicians involved with identifying new targets to treat mood disorders, according to David Fleck, Ph.
Mood disorders are points on a spectrum, not completely separate, according to a large, new study.