Moore's law


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Moore's law

 (mo͝orz, môrz)
n.
The prediction that the number of transistors that can be placed on an affordable integrated circuit will double during a specific time period, usually said to be every 18 months or every 2 years.

[After Gordon Moore (born 1929), American entrepreneur and developer of microchips who first proposed the principle.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Boosting computer performance by accumulating hundreds or thousands of cores per chip allows users to exploit massively parallel execution, but it also requires large increases in the number of transistors on a chip, and hence an unconstrained continuation of Moore's Law.
Moore's Law originated from an observation that the number of transistors in an integrated circuit doubled every 18 months.
Moore's Law, named after one of the founders of Intel, states that the number of transistors on a processor chip doubles every 18 months for the same cost.
Long-term trends like Moore's Law and its analogues for storage and bandwidth improvements have steadily pushed back the boundary of the impossible.
Soo-Young Oh, director of IT Convergence & Components Lab of ETRI (Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute), will lead the plenary session at this year's Conference with "The Story of Moore," in which he will look beyond Moore's Law to review the current and future progress of "Nano Sensors" and MEMS.
Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC), the world's leading university-research consortium for semiconductors and related technologies, today announced the success of its research with insulators containing the exotic metal hafnium toward significantly extending Moore's Law.
It also ensures Moore's Law, a high-tech industry axiom that transistor counts double about every two years, thrives well into the next decade.
This is phenomenal 74% annual compounded increase in storage per dollar or a doubling of storage per dollar every 15 months for 25 years, basically proving that Moore's law applies to external storage as well as memory," he proudly stated.
This new result shows that unlike flash, phase-change memory technology can improve as it gets smaller with Moore's Law advancements.
Moore's Law, coined by Intel founder Gordon Moore, is often broadly applied to the rapid pace of technology development with its prediction of a doubling of computer processing power being achieved in 18 months intervals.
By combining that technology with WDM capability, Luxtera is now the first photonics company to demonstrate a feasibility of applying Moore's Law to fiber bandwidth scalability implemented in a low cost commercial CMOS fabrication process.
Transition to EUVL technology will enable the continuation of increased number of transistors per-square-millimeter consistent with Moore's law, which predicts the computing power of semiconductors should double roughly every two years.