Moore's law


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Moore's law

 (mo͝orz, môrz)
n.
The prediction that the number of transistors that can be placed on an affordable integrated circuit will double during a specific time period, usually said to be every 18 months or every 2 years.

[After Gordon Moore (born 1929), American entrepreneur and developer of microchips who first proposed the principle.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, Jonathan Wilkins, marketing director of industrial automation components supplier European Automation, analyses the rate of technological progress and discusses the validity of Moore's Law.
BOHR: Moore's Law is a driving force of technological, economic and social change and is a foundational force in modern life.
It dawned on me that throughout my career the mantra of Moore's Law has been driving virtually all segments of anything related to technology.
Happy belated birthday to Moore's Law, which turned 50 years old last month .
17, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- The eBeam Initiative, a forum dedicated to the education and promotion of new semiconductor manufacturing approaches based on electron beam (eBeam) technologies, today announced that its top theme for 2015 will be the reactivation of the density benefits of Moore's Law through eBeam technology .
Physicists and engineers have long predicted that Moore's Law would reach its limit, but the date keeps getting pushed into the future.
This has led to fears that Moore's Law - the prediction by Intel founder Gordon Moore that the number of transistors on microchips will double every two years - could be about to come to an end, del Alamo noted.
Summary: The American futurist applies Moore's law to technology and propagates
headquarters, Intel called the new Tri-Gate transistors the next step in Moore's Law.
TSMC) Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Morris Chang said yesterday solar energy and LED will become his company's two pivotal businesses in the years to come and the Moore's Law will reach its limit in seven to eight years.
The Chemical Heritage Foundation organized the symposium Moore's Law at 40: Chemistry and the Electronics Revolution, in the spring of 2005, where Gordon Moore delivered a talk on his law.
When it comes to computing, Moore's Law famously specifies that the number of transistors on a chip will double every two years.