Moorish


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Related to Moorish: moreish

Moor·ish

 (mo͝or′ĭsh)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the Moors or their culture.
2. Of, relating to, or being a style of Spanish architecture of the 8th to the 16th century, characterized by the horseshoe arch and ornate decoration.

Moorish

(ˈmʊərɪʃ; ˈmɔː-)
adj
1. (Peoples) of or relating to the Moors
2. (Architecture) denoting the style of architecture used in Spain from the 13th to 16th century, characterized by the horseshoe arch
Also: Morisco or Moresco

Moor•ish

(ˈmʊər ɪʃ)

adj.
of, pertaining to, or characteristic of the Moors or Moorish culture.
[1400–50; late Middle English morys]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Moorish - a style of architecture common in Spain from the 13th to 16th centuriesMoorish - a style of architecture common in Spain from the 13th to 16th centuries; characterized by horseshoe-shaped arches
architectural style, style of architecture, type of architecture - architecture as a kind of art form
Adj.1.Moorish - relating to or characteristic of the Moors; "Moorish courtyard"
Translations

Moorish

[ˈmʊərɪʃ] ADJ [person] → moro; [culture, influence, invasion] → árabe; [architecture] → morisco

Moorish

[ˈmʊərɪʃ] adjmaure, mauresque

Moorish

adjmaurisch; invasionder Mauren

Moorish

[ˈmʊərɪʃ] adjmoresco/a
References in classic literature ?
in good time, though, to his great delight, the three salt-sea warriors would rise and depart; to his credulous, fable-mongering ears, all their martial bones jingling in them at every step, like Moorish scimetars in scabbards.
It was built in the Moorish fashion,--a square building enclosing a court-yard, into which the carriage drove through an arched gateway.
I am poor; for I find that, when I have paid my father's debts, all the patrimony remaining to me will be this crumbling grange, the row of scathed firs behind, and the patch of moorish soil, with the yew- trees and holly-bushes in front.
It was a rather curious one of Moorish workmanship, made of dull silver inlaid with arabesques of burnished steel, and studded with coarse turquoises.
This relation was confirmed by the Moorish officer who came with us, who, as he said, had lost a servant in that manner: the man certainly fell into the hands of the Galles, who lurk in those dark retreats, cut the throats of the merchants, and carry off their effects.
Many were the compliments and expressions of politeness that passed between Don Quixote and Don Fernando; but they were brought to an end by a traveller who at this moment entered the inn, and who seemed from his attire to be a Christian lately come from the country of the Moors, for he was dressed in a short-skirted coat of blue cloth with half-sleeves and without a collar; his breeches were also of blue cloth, and his cap of the same colour, and he wore yellow buskins and had a Moorish cutlass slung from a baldric across his breast.
This village, constructed in a singular and picturesque manner, half Moorish, half Spanish, still remains, and is inhabited by descendants of the first comers, who speak the language of their fathers.
He is cased in a cuirass of double-fold deer skin, and carries a bull's hide shield; he is forked in a Moorish saddle, high before and behind; his feet are thrust into wooden box stirrups, of Moorish fashion, and a tremendous pair of iron spurs, fastened by chains, jingle at his heels.
Or "One stone terrace (cracked), one gondola in distance, one Venetian senator's dress complete, richly embroidered white satin costume with profile portrait of Miss Jogg the model, one Scimitar superbly mounted in gold with jewelled handle, elaborate Moorish dress (very rare), and Othello.
There is an English garrison at Gibraltar of 6,000 or 7,000 men, and so uniforms of flaming red are plenty; and red and blue, and undress costumes of snowy white, and also the queer uniform of the bare-kneed Highlander; and one sees soft-eyed Spanish girls from San Roque, and veiled Moorish beauties (I suppose they are beauties) from Tarifa, and turbaned, sashed, and trousered Moorish merchants from Fez, and long- robed, bare-legged, ragged Muhammadan vagabonds from Tetuan and Tangier, some brown, some yellow and some as black as virgin ink--and Jews from all around, in gabardine, skullcap, and slippers, just as they are in pictures and theaters, and just as they were three thousand years ago, no doubt.
They ought at least, to give us a moorish dance, or some other mummer
In reading his 'Chronicle' I suffered for a time from its attribution to Fray Antonio Agapida, the pious monk whom he feigns to have written it, just as in reading 'Don Quixote' I suffered from Cervantes masquerading as the Moorish scribe, Cid Hamet Ben Engeli.