Moors


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moor 1

 (mo͝or)
v. moored, moor·ing, moors
v.tr.
1. To make fast (a vessel, for example) by means of cables, anchors, or lines: moor a ship to a dock; a dirigible moored to a tower.
2. To fix in place; secure: a mailbox moored to the sidewalk with bolts. See Synonyms at fasten.
3. To provide with an abiding emotional attachment: a politician moored to the family back home.
v.intr.
1. To secure a vessel or aircraft with lines or anchors.
2. To be secured with lines or anchors: The freighter moored alongside the wharf.

[Middle English moren.]

moor 2

 (mo͝or)
n.
An uncultivated area covered with low-growing vegetation and often high but poorly drained.

[Middle English mor, from Old English mōr.]

Moor

 (mo͝or)
n.
1. A member of a traditionally Muslim people of mixed Berber and Arab ancestry, now living chiefly in northwest Africa.
2. One of the Muslims who invaded Spain in the 8th century and established a civilization in Andalusia that lasted until the late 15th century.

[Middle English More, from Old French, from Medieval Latin Mōrus, from Latin Maurus, Mauritanian, from Greek Mauros.]

Moors

Muslims of mixed Berber and Arab descent conquering Spain 711–1492.
References in classic literature ?
All looked colder and darker in that visionary hollow than in reality: and the strange little figure there gazing at me, with a white face and arms specking the gloom, and glittering eyes of fear moving where all else was still, had the effect of a real spirit: I thought it like one of the tiny phantoms, half fairy, half imp, Bessie's evening stories represented as coming out of lone, ferny dells in moors, and appearing before the eyes of belated travellers.
People familiar with these moors often miss their road on such evenings; and I can tell you there is no chance of a change at present.
uf; ``were they black Turks or Moors, Sir Templar, or the craven peasants of France, most valiant De Bracy; but these are English yeomen, over whom we shall have no advantage, save what we may derive from our arms and horses, which will avail us little in the glades of the forest.
At night, when our sailors, especially the Moors, were in a profound sleep (for the Mohammedans, believing everything forewritten in the decrees of God, and not alterable by any human means, resign themselves entirely to Providence), our vessel ran aground upon a sand bank at the entrance of the harbour.
For all that, he was much grieved at the loss of his lance, and saying so to his squire, he added, "I remember having read how a Spanish knight, Diego Perez de Vargas by name, having broken his sword in battle, tore from an oak a ponderous bough or branch, and with it did such things that day, and pounded so many Moors, that he got the surname of Machuca, and he and his descendants from that day forth were called Vargas y Machuca.
They still had hopes that the trainer had for some reason taken out the horse for early exercise, but on ascending the knoll near the house, from which all the neighboring moors were visible, they not only could see no signs of the missing favorite, but they perceived something which warned them that they were in the presence of a tragedy.
There are stalwart Bedouins of the desert here, and stately Moors proud of a history that goes back to the night of time; and Jews whose fathers fled hither centuries upon centuries ago; and swarthy Riffians from the mountains--born cut-throats--and original, genuine Negroes as black as Moses; and howling dervishes and a hundred breeds of Arabs--all sorts and descriptions of people that are foreign and curious to look upon.
But, my dear professor," he was saying, "I still maintain that but for the victories of Ferdinand and Isabella over the fifteenth-century Moors in Spain the world would be today a thousand years in advance of where we now find ourselves.
This northern air is invigorating and pleasant, so I propose to spend a few days upon your moors, and to occupy my mind as best I may.
I really cannot say now whether I loved the Moors or the Spaniards more.
However, to cut short this melancholy part of our story, our ship being disabled, and three of our men killed, and eight wounded, we were obliged to yield, and were carried all prisoners into Sallee, a port belonging to the Moors.
She was not at all a timid child and she was not exactly frightened, but she felt that there was no knowing what might happen in a house with a hundred rooms nearly all shut up--a house standing on the edge of a moor.