emergency contraception

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emergency contraception

n.
Measures taken to reduce the risk of pregnancy within a few days after sexual intercourse during which contraceptives failed or were not used. Forms of emergency contraception include oral drugs such as levonorgestrel and insertion of a copper intrauterine device.
References in periodicals archive ?
You can get a morning after pill if there's any question.
A young girl, posed by model, takes a morning after pill STEVE MURPHY
Previously, the morning after pill was available free only if a woman got a prescription from a GP or a family planning clinic.
The government had been fighting Korman's ruling, without much success, as the 2nd Circuit ordered the unrestricted sale of the two-pill version of the morning after pill in early June.
For more InsideCounsel coverage of the morning after pill, see below: Government will allow morning after pill to be sold to all ages 2nd Circuit orders unrestricted sale of some emergency contraceptives FDA appeals "morning after" pill ruling Judge strikes down restrictions on "morning after" pill Hobby Lobby must cover morning-after pill, judge rules
The morning after pill should be a last resort to prevent an unwanted pregnancy after having unprotected sex or if another method of contraception has failed, such as if you have forgotten to take one of your contraceptive pills.
Under product licensing rules, pharmacists are not allowed to sell the morning after pill - the proper name for which is Emergency Hormonal Contraception (EHC) - to children under 16 yet some local health board schemes allow the pill to be given to children as young as 13.
The advert will show a woman waking up next to her partner and then taking a trip to a pharmacy to ask for the drug, which is the only morning after pill available to women in the UK.
One in ten women said they were too embarrassed to go and ask their GP or pharmacist for the morning after pill.
It will inevitably result in young men putting pressure on vulnerable girls to have sex by telling them that if they are worried about getting pregnant, they can always go to a local chemist the following day and get the morning after pill free of charge.
Over the same period, the proportion of women obtaining the morning after pill from their own GP or practice nurse fell from 41 per cent in 2003/04 to 33 per cent in 2004/05 and the proportion getting it from a walk-in centre or minor-injuries unit fell from 11 per cent to three per cent.