Morocco


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Mo·roc·co

 (mə-rŏk′ō)
A country of northwest Africa on the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. Inhabited from ancient times by Berbers, the region became a Roman province in the 1st century ad and was conquered by Arabs in the 7th century. The country was later united (11th-13th century) under Berber-Muslim dynasties. The French established a protectorate over most of the region in 1912, and in 1956 Morocco achieved independence as a kingdom. Rabat is the capital and Casablanca the largest city.

Mo·roc′can adj. & n.

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Morocco

mo·roc·co

 (mə-rŏk′ō)
n. pl. mo·roc·cos
A soft fine leather of goatskin traditionally tanned with sumac and used especially for book bindings.

[After Morocco.]

Morocco

(məˈrɒkəʊ)
n
(Placename) a kingdom in NW Africa, on the Mediterranean and the Atlantic: conquered by the Arabs in about 683, who introduced Islam; at its height under Berber dynasties (11th–13th centuries); became a French protectorate in 1912 and gained independence in 1956. It is mostly mountainous, with the Atlas Mountains in the centre and the Rif range along the Mediterranean coast, with the Sahara in the south and southeast; an important exporter of phosphates. Official language: Arabic; Berber and French are also widely spoken. Official religion: (Sunni) Muslim. Currency: dirham. Capital: Rabat. Pop: 32 649 130 (2013 est). Area: 458 730 sq km (177 117 sq miles). French name: Maroc

morocco

(məˈrɒkəʊ)
n
(Tanning)
a. a fine soft leather made from goatskins, used for bookbinding, shoes, etc
b. (as modifier): morocco leather.
[C17: after Morocco, where it was originally made]

Mo•roc•co

(məˈrɒk oʊ)

n.
1. French, Maroc. a kingdom in NW Africa: formed from a sultanate that was divided into two protectorates (French Morocco and Spanish Morocco) and an international zone. 29,661,636; 172,104 sq. mi. (445,749 sq. km).Cap.: Rabat.
2. (l.c.) a pebble-grained leather orig. made in Morocco from goatskin tanned with sumac.
Mo•roc′can, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Morocco - a kingdom (constitutional monarchy) in northwestern Africa with a largely Muslim populationMorocco - a kingdom (constitutional monarchy) in northwestern Africa with a largely Muslim population; achieved independence from France in 1956
Arab League - an international organization of independent Arab states formed in 1945 to promote cultural and economic and military and political and social cooperation
Maghreb, Mahgrib - the region of northwest Africa comprising the Atlas Mountains and the coastlands of Morocco and Algeria and Tunisia
Casablanca - a port on the Atlantic and the largest city of Morocco
El Aaium - a town in Morocco near the Atlantic coast
Fes, Fez - a city in north central Morocco; religious center
Marrakech, Marrakesh - a city in western Morocco; tourist center
Oujda - a city in northeastern Morocco near the Algerian border
capital of Morocco, Rabat - the capital of Morocco; located in the northwestern on the Atlantic coast
Tangier, Tangiers - a city of northern Morocco at the west end of the Strait of Gibraltar; "the first tangerines were shipped from Tangier to Europe in 1841"
Spanish Sahara, Western Sahara - an area in northwestern Africa with rich phosphate deposits; under Moroccan control since 1992
Atlas Mountains - a mountain range in northern Africa between the Mediterranean and the Sahara Desert; extends from southwestern Morocco to northern Tunisia
Abila, Abyla, Jebel Musa - a promontory in northern Morocco opposite the Rock of Gibraltar; one of the Pillars of Hercules
Moroccan - a native or inhabitant of Morocco
2.morocco - a soft pebble-grained leather made from goatskin; used for shoes and book bindings etc.
leather - an animal skin made smooth and flexible by removing the hair and then tanning
Levant, Levant morocco - a heavy morocco often used in bookbinding
Translations
Мароко
Maroko
Marokko
Maroko
Marokko
Maroko
Marokkó
モロッコ
모로코
Maroc
Maroko
Marocko
ประเทศโมร็อกโก
nước Maroc

Morocco

[məˈrɒkəʊ] NMarruecos m

morocco

[məˈrɒkəʊ] N (also morocco leather) → marroquí m, tafilete m

Morocco

[məˈrɒkəʊ] nMaroc m
in Morocco → au Maroc

Morocco

nMarokko nt

morocco

n (also morocco leather)Maroquin nt

Morocco

[məˈrɒkəʊ] n
a.il Marocco
b. (also Morocco leather) → marocchino

Morocco

الْـمَغْرِبُ Maroko Marokko Marokko Μαρόκο Marruecos Marokko Maroc Maroko Marocco モロッコ 모로코 Marokko Marokko Maroko Marrocos Марокко Marocko ประเทศโมร็อกโก Fas nước Maroc 摩洛哥
References in classic literature ?
And noticing a gleam of light peeping in beside one of the serge curtains, he cheerfully dropped his feet over the edge of the sofa, and felt about with them for his slippers, a present on his last birthday, worked for him by his wife on gold-colored morocco.
There was no country on the face of the globe he had not seen, nor battle he had not been engaged in; he had killed more Moors than there are in Morocco and Tunis, and fought more single combats, according to his own account, than Garcilaso, Diego Garcia de Paredes and a thousand others he named, and out of all he had come victorious without losing a drop of blood.
They were destroyed by the Fouillanes in 1826; the city was one-third larger then, for Timbuctoo, an object generally coveted by all the tribes, since the eleventh century, has belonged in succession to the Touaregs, the Sonrayans, the Morocco men, and the Fouillanes; and this great centre of civilization, where a sage like Ahmed-Baba owned, in the sixteenth century, a library of sixteen hundred manuscripts, is now nothing but a mere half-way house for the trade of Central Africa.
As the deceased had taken no further notice of his nephew in his lifetime, than sending to his eldest boy (who had been christened after him, on desperate speculation) a silver spoon in a morocco case, which, as he had not too much to eat with it, seemed a kind of satire upon his having been born without that useful article of plate in his mouth, Mr Godfrey Nickleby could, at first, scarcely believe the tidings thus conveyed to him.
But an apology for invading the hermitage was still necessary; so I had furnished myself with a blue morocco collar for Arthur's little dog; and that being given and received, with much more joy and gratitude, on the part of the receiver, than the worth of the gift or the selfish motive of the giver deserved, I ventured to ask Mrs.
of black homespun, with little bootees, bound with an uncolored calf-skin for the want of red morocco.
In former times the Morocco rascals used to coast along the Spanish Main in their boats till a safe opportunity seemed to present itself, and then dart in and capture a Spanish village and carry off all the pretty women they could find.
said one gentleman-courier with a large morocco money-bag and ear-rings to another with ear-rings and a large morocco money-bag.
The sun had reached the other side of the house, and its slanting rays shone into the open window, lighting up the room and part of the morocco cushion at which Princess Mary was looking.
And this little daughter was a princess, and people streamed to the castle, and Karen was there also, and the little princess stood in her fine white dress, in a window, and let herself be stared at; she had neither a train nor a golden crown, but splendid red morocco shoes.
It was an ordinary morocco affair, similar to those issued by American banking houses to enclose letters of credit.
He exhibited a daguerreotype miniature in a morocco case.