mortiferous


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mortiferous

(mɔːˈtɪfərəs)
adj
1. causing or bringing death
2. causing spiritual death
References in periodicals archive ?
MORTIFEROUS A Extremely gloomy B Fatal C Humiliating who am I?
Again, in keeping with Baudelaire's indifferent, mortiferous beauty, "[e]lle compte des deuils divers dans ses souvenirs" (110).
The cause was originally thought to be static electricity or the smoke that billowed from railroad locomotives or the mortiferous vapours rising from underground volcanoes.
From then on, fluids appear increasingly throughout the rest of the film--from alcohol, which divides men, to torrential rain in the India sequences, to the fever--to culminate in a bowl of poison from which Alexander drinks and in which he sees the mortiferous face of his mother as Medusa.
In low burlesque style, Cervantes satirizes his own poetics of empire by portraying the mock epic battle on Parnassus in rhetorical terms that infuse with racial and ethnic overtones the seemingly perennial epic battle between radically opposed aesthetic ideals (the deceptively simple and well-delineated dichotomy between bad and good poets), which may well be compared to the not any less contentious and mortiferous battle between religions (Christianity and Islam) and civilizations (Europe and the Muslim world, embodied by the Ottoman empire).
at the presence of so tedious, vexatious, virulent and mortiferous a sociate" (Aimatiasis, 23; 21).
The very fact that Sofka should appear for the first time in a photograph representing a group posing for the photographer makes her doubly spectral: the intimate link between photography and death has often been commented on by critics who have emphasized the mortiferous, siderating power of the photographic act, and the disincarnation, or reification, that ensues for the subject who is being photographed.