mortification

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mor·ti·fi·ca·tion

 (môr′tə-fĭ-kā′shən)
n.
1. A feeling of shame, humiliation, or wounded pride.
2. Discipline of the body and the appetites by self-denial or self-inflicted privation, especially when undertaken for religious reasons.
3. Death or decay of living tissue; gangrene.

mortification

(ˌmɔːtɪfɪˈkeɪʃən)
n
1. a feeling of loss of prestige or self-respect; humiliation
2. something causing this
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity the practice of mortifying the senses
4. (Pathology) another word for gangrene

mor•ti•fi•ca•tion

(ˌmɔr tə fɪˈkeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a feeling of humiliation or shame, as through injury to one's pride or self-respect.
2. a cause or source of such a feeling.
3. the practice of asceticism by penitential discipline to overcome desire for sin and to strengthen the will.
4. the death of one part of a live body; gangrene; necrosis.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin =mortificā(re) (see mortify) + Latin -tiō -tion]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mortification - strong feelings of embarrassmentmortification - strong feelings of embarrassment  
embarrassment - the shame you feel when your inadequacy or guilt is made public
2.mortification - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)mortification - the localized death of living cells (as from infection or the interruption of blood supply)
death - the permanent end of all life functions in an organism or part of an organism; "the animal died a painful death"
myonecrosis - localized death of muscle cell fibers
3.mortification - an instance in which you are caused to lose your prestige or self-respect; "he had to undergo one humiliation after another"
case, instance, example - an occurrence of something; "it was a case of bad judgment"; "another instance occurred yesterday"; "but there is always the famous example of the Smiths"
4.mortification - (Christianity) the act of mortifying the lusts of the flesh by self-denial and privation (especially by bodily pain or discomfort inflicted on yourself)
self-control, self-denial, self-discipline - the act of denying yourself; controlling your impulses
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior

mortification

noun
2. discipline, control, denial, chastening, subjugation, abasement ascetism and mortification of the flesh
3. (Medical) gangrene, corruption, festering, necrosis, putrescence He treated cases of infection, ulceration and mortification.

mortification

noun
A lowering in or deprivation of character or self-esteem:
Translations
إذْلال، مُعامَلَه مُذِلَّه
askeze
ydmygelse
önsanyargatás
niîurlæging
apspiešanapazemojums
askéza

mortification

[ˌmɔːtɪfɪˈkeɪʃən] Nmortificación f, humillación f, vergüenza f

mortification

n
Beschämung f; (= embarrassment)äußerste Verlegenheit; (= humiliation)Demütigung f; much to his mortification, she …er empfand es als sehr beschämend, dass sie …; (embarrassment) → es war ihm äußerst peinlich, dass sie …; (humiliation) → er empfand es als eine Schmach, dass sie …; I discovered to my mortification that I had made a mistakeich stellte zu meiner größten Verlegenheit fest, dass ich einen Fehler gemacht hatte; because of her mortification at what had happenedweil ihr das, was geschehen war, so überaus peinlich war; he felt great mortification at being rejecteder empfand es als eine Schmach or Schande, dass er nicht angenommen wurde
(Rel) → Kasteiung f
(Med) → Brand m

mortification

[ˌmɔːtɪfɪˈkeɪʃn] nmortificazione f

mortify

(ˈmoː(r)tifai) verb
be/feel mortified to be/feel extremely embarrassed or humiliated: He was mortified when she slapped him.
mortifying adjective
How mortifying for you!
ˌmortifiˈcation (-fi-) noun
References in classic literature ?
Has it not preached in the place of these, charity and poverty, celibacy and mortification of the flesh, monastic life and Mother Church?
There he will sit for hours, in a broiling sun or, perhaps, over a hole in the lee, in the coldest days in winter, under the lee of a few bushes, and not a fish will he catch, after all this mortification of the flesh.
This begins the period of Lent, a time on the liturgical calendar when Christians practice penance, mortification of the flesh and, significantly, self-denial.