motet

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mo·tet

 (mō-tĕt′)
n.
A polyphonic composition based on a sacred text and usually sung without accompaniment.

[Middle English, from Old French, diminutive of mot, word; see mot.]

motet

(məʊˈtɛt)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) a polyphonic choral composition used as an anthem in the Roman Catholic service
[C14: from Old French, diminutive of mot word; see mot1]

mo•tet

(moʊˈtɛt)

n.
an unaccompanied, polyphonic choral composition usu. on a sacred text.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French; see mot, -et]

motet

A piece of polyphonic sacred music for unaccompanied voices.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.motet - an unaccompanied choral composition with sacred lyrics; intended to be sung as part of a church service; originated in the 13th century
musical composition, opus, piece of music, composition, piece - a musical work that has been created; "the composition is written in four movements"
Translations
motett

motet

[məʊˈtet] Nmotete m

motet

nMotette f
References in classic literature ?
That day, at the Ponceau Fountain, there were wild men and women, who fought and assumed many aspects, as they sang little motets and bergerettes.
The proportion 6:4:2:3 is not found elsewhere in Dufay's isorhythmic motets nor does it appear in those of any other composer.
In two recent instalments in their ongoing project to record all Ockeghem's Masses, Missa Prolationum/5 motets (ASV GAU 143, rec), and Missa De plus en plus/5 motets (ASV GAU 153, rec 1995), the ensemble goes from strength to strength.
Bach's motets came to this reviewer's attention in 2007-- one newly recorded by the Hilliard Ensemble, the other a collection of older recordings originally issued in 2005 and forwarded for review consideration in 2007 by a representative of the School of Music at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
He has also, it should be noted, edited a companion volume of scores, Savonarolan Laude, Motets, and Anthems, Recent Researches in the Music of the Renaissance, 116.
Greater emphasis on the other end of Brownlee's spectrum of intentionality is witnessed in the two essays in this volume concerning the motets of Philippe de Vitry.
Peter's particularly distinguishes that music establishment: the manuscript SPB80, a collection of polyphonic masses and motets intended for performance at the basilica, copied circa 1475.
In order to illustrate the influence of Josquin on these two composers, their works are presented in combination with one of his motets (Benedicta es) and two of his secular chansons (Nimphes nappes and Faulte d'argent).
The emphasis she places on the central notions through affective musical imagery would seem to indicate that they are also the expression of personal devotion; and it is undoubtedly self-conscious on her part that she stresses references to music, or to singing and playing, in her motets.
Spruchmotetten (individual motets setting key passages of liturgically prescribed Gospel readings) were popular already in the sixteenth century, and by the early seventeenth century, composers were publishing complete collections of Spruchmotetten that provided one work for every Sunday and holiday of the church year.
those composed upon pre-existing motets, madrigals and chansons, rather than upon psalmodic formulas from plainsong) remind us how much we yet can learn from Lasso, whose devotion and skill enabled him to embrace and sustain a diverse inheritance.
His music, secular and sacred, was printed in large quantities from 1543 onwards; and nearly 20 years after his presumed death in 1557 a major retrospective of his motets was published.