lee wave

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lee wave

n
(Physical Geography) meteorol a stationary wave sometimes formed in an air stream on the leeward side of a hill or mountain range
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I finally realized that it was the combo of ice increasing drag, falling precip with its slight downward current and the biggie, mountain wave.
The model supported light-to-moderate clear air turbulence from 6400 feet msl through 8000 feet, and mountain wave development from 10,000 to 12,000 feet msl.
Russ Gubele with Mountain Wave Search and Rescue says the hiker had built a snow cave for shelter overnight.
Unlike a wave of water that rolls onto a beach, it is hard to see the mountain wave in the atmosphere, because the separate layers of warm and cold air are not as easily distinguished.
For example, an animation of a mountain wave activity over the southern Rockies in New Mexico can be seen on the NOAA web page: http://www.
Moreover, mountain wave turbulence had a devastating effect on aircraft fuselages.
We then needed to beat the weather forecast of strong westerly winds, mountain wave, and turbulence.
Following Poulos et al (2000), this value leads to a situation where the downslope phase of the mountain wave couples with the katabatic flow, enhancing its speed.
In came security software and services vendor Axent Technology for $975 million in stock and, in the last year, the company has bought a string of smaller start-up vendors, most notably, Riptech, Recourse Technologies, SecurityFocus and Mountain Wave.
Standardized mountain-wave activity reporting, for example, should include an airspeed range, and classify the difference between a smooth and turbulent mountain wave encounter.
Mountain wave turbulence is caused by gravity waves and interaction with strong winds across terrain.
On 20 December 2008, when the flight veered off the left side of runway 34R during takeoff from Denver International Airport, mountain wave and down sloping wind conditions existed in the Denver area and strong localised winds associated with these conditions posed a threat to operations at the airport.

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