Mulciber


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Mulciber

(ˈmʌlsɪbə)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) another name for Vulcan1
References in periodicals archive ?
When Scudamour, encouraged by Britomart's success, attempts the same, "cruell Mulciber [epithet of Vulcan, Roman god of fire] would not obay / His threatfull pride" (26.
When writers tell this story of Mulciber they are, Milton says, "erring.
This is the fall of Mulciber, the name by which the Greeks knew Mammon, of whom they fabled:
This demesne, men say, was the price paid by Mulciber for the kisses of his wife; these towers were the gift of a loving husband.
Both Ovid and Milton include details about Mulciber, or Vulcan, that contribute usefully to the final ambiguity of Morrison's blacksmith.
hic Nomadum genus et discinctos Mulciber Afros, hic Lelegas Carasque sagittiferosque Gelonos finxerat; Euphrates ibat iam molior undis, extremique hominum Morini, Rhenusque bicornis, indomitique Dahae, etpontem indignatus Araxes (A.
Mulcifer di 1, 17 (Vertex Mulciferi) si spiega in rapporto a ferrum (ex ferri praedicta anhelabat urna, quae tamen uertex Mulciferi dicebatur) che giustifica la scelta della lezione contro Mulciber accolto da Willis (1983) e Shanzer (1986).
49) The emphatic references to the 'Giants' (50) relate pointedly to the descriptions of the Fallen Angels in the first book of the poem, where, as Collett once pointed out, 'all the mythological references, with the exception of Mulciber at the end, are to the Titans' (p.
Moreover, it is fun to think of the god who melts all metals in his fire, Mulciber (called thus for the only time in the Aeneid in 8.
The inequality stated in the comparison--that Eden is more beautiful than other paradises--implies as well this more important distinction, which is implicit throughout Paradise Lost and explicit in places, as in the tag, "Thus they relate / Erring," appended to a classical account of the fall of Mulciber (28; I, 11.
Simply George (Ron Boss) trounces Texas Scramble (Rod Simpson/ Andrew Tucker) in the juvenile maiden, and Crystal Heights (Bill O'Gorman) beats Mulciber (Guy Harwood/Ray Cochrane)
506 thus creates a complex intertextual relationship among Pliny's Naturalis Historia, Ovid's Metamorphoses, the myth of Mulciber, the involuntary transformation of the demons into serpents in Paradise Lost, X, and the building of Pandaemonium in Paradise Lost, I.