multiverse

(redirected from Multiverses)
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Related to Multiverses: dark matter, String theory

mul·ti·verse

 (mŭl′tə-vûrs′)
n.
1. The collection of parallel universes that comprise all of reality in some quantum mechanical and cosmological theories.
2. A similar collection of parallel universes in a work of fiction or a series of related works of fiction.

multiverse

(ˈmʌltɪˌvɜːs)
n
(Astronomy) astronomy the aggregate of all existing matter, of which the universe is but a tiny fragment
Translations
Multiversum
References in periodicals archive ?
He points out that, in most models, if you have inflation, you also get multiverses.
The only context in which QM enters is that the theory allows, but does not require, the possibility of multiverses.
Touching on such potentially head-scratching topics as Schrodinger's cat, multiverses and evolution, Robin Ince's Happiness Through Science initially sounds more like a university lecture than a comedy show.
Join him in a world of Schrodinger cats, multiverses and evolutionary conundrums as he orienteers through the craggy landscape of evolution while plumbing the depths of his own murky consciousness .
Some physicists feel uncomfortable about the theory that a particle has no single history, a theory that is crucial to the concept of multiverses as presently formulated.
25) On the other hand, even if there were evidence for multiverses, this hypothesis, like that of Guth and others, leaves unanswered this central question: From where did the organizing physics and information for the whole ensemble of universes come?
The ultimate goal is for all the books combined to be a "grand project on the future of intelligent life, both here on earth and there in deep space unto multiverses.
He argues that space and time can be understood from multiple perspectives in relation to culture, society, nature, and the mind; that each perspective exists in each of these realms for good reasons; and that space and time will eventually be superseded by post-humans both in this universe and in multiverses.
Subsequent theories were to give birth to many variations of the Big Bang model and the process continues, producing, in turn, an inflationary universe, a chaotic universe, multiverses, an eternal universe, and so on.
He then points out that a more common approach is the so-called "weak anthropic principle" in which our universe, among endless multiverses, by chance has the right properties for life.
He also summarizes string theory, the expansionary model of the universe, and the notion of multiverses (universes other than our own).
The first section has Jim Peebles, Martin Rees, Bob Hazen, and Steve Schneider, among others, providing eight excellent summaries of current thinking regarding the evolution of the universe including the first stars, the existence of multiverses, the fate of the universe, misconceptions about the Big Bang, and the evolution of Earth.