Munchausen syndrome by proxy


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Munchausen syndrome by proxy

n.
A psychiatric disorder in which a parent or other caregiver seeks attention from medical professionals by causing or fabricating signs or symptoms of illness in a child.

Mun′chausen syn`drome by prox′y


n.
a form of Munchausen syndrome in which a person induces or claims to observe a disease in another, usually a close relative, in order to attract the doctor's attention to herself or himself.
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors make the case that the term Munchausen syndrome by proxy should be permanently retired and replaced with a commonsense appreciation that children can be abused by their parents in the medical environment.
Whatever the outcome, I hope that this hearing does not overshadow all the work he has completed over his long and distinguished career, including on Fabricated or Induced Illness, which was formerly known as Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy.
Affected patients seek to simulate true medical illness, whether their wounds are self-inflected, as in Munchausen syndrome, or the parent inflicts them on a child, as in Munchausen syndrome by proxy.
He had invented Munchausen syndrome by proxy and lived on it ever since as a permanent professional witness, she told the Commons.
Compliance with treatment in asthma and Munchausen syndrome by proxy.
In Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP), a person fabricates illness in a child the person is ostensibly caring for.
They were accused of exhibiting symptoms of a bizarre psychiatric ailment called Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSBP) that led them to fabricate the girls' illnesses to fulfill their own needs for attention and sympathy.
Reports suggested Hamilton might have been suffering from Munchausen syndrome by proxy, a condition where mothers harm children in order to draw attention to themselves.
The parents contend that the child, known as Aurora Lipscomb, suffers from gender identity disorder, but authorities argue that the child is a victim of Munchausen syndrome by proxy, in which parents harm their children in order to gain attention for themselves.
The September issue of the magazine carried stories on: competency because of brain damage in a murder case; victims, the effects of Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome and the ability to testify; termination of parental rights; using a physical stroke (transient ischemic attack) as a defense for theft; the denial of John Hinckley's release petition; and, court recognition of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy.
Respondent Yvonne Eldridge suffers from Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy, resulting in conduct as specified in paragraphs VI and VII above; and B.
Using color photos to illustrate, they address different types of abuse, reporting and documentation, imaging, recognizing abuse, and the examination, pathophysiology, management, and differential diagnosis of bruises, burns, cutaneous conditions that mimic abuse, ocular trauma, otolaryngologic manifestations, abdominal trauma, anogenital findings and sexual abuse, child maltreatment fatalities, failure to thrive, and Munchausen syndrome by proxy.