Hanepoot

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Hanepoot

(ˈhɑːnəˌpʊət) (ˈhɑːnəˌpuːt) or

haanepoot

n
(Plants) South African a variety of muscat grape used as a dessert fruit and in making wine
[from Afrikaans hane cock + poot claw]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Muscat of Alexandria selections are registered at FPS and available from several nurseries.
50, Waitrose, Tesco, Majestic, The (PS Tanners, Ocado & independents) is an intriguing wine made from muscat of alexandria and gewurztraminer.
The famous pharaoh was keen on a glass, or whatever kind of drinking vessels they used around 50BC, of wine made from a grape known as Muscat of Alexandria, according to winefolloy.
The drinks is made with singani, a Bolivian spirit produced from Muscat of Alexandria grapes grown at high altitudes.
Fact of the week: DNA evidence suggests Argentinian torrontes is related to the ancient muscat of Alexandria variety and Spanish 'mission'' grapes that were introduced during the conquest of the Americas.
The tough, scrubby Zibibbo vines on Pantelleria, the Sicilian name for Muscat of Alexandria, make wine particularly worthy of gentle contemplation, especially the stunning Ben Ry, made from a tiny quantity of juice squeezed from hundred-year-old vines.
The result is a fresh wine called Natureo and is made from the ancient grape the Muscat of Alexandria, or Moscatel de Alejandria.
With its rich, fruity, muscat-flavor, this grape provides an important alternative to Muscat of Alexandria, the muscat most commonly used to make dessert wines or confections such as chocolate-covered raisins.
Among the most popular of these are Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Semillon, and the whole family of Muscats, including Muscat Canelli, Muscat of Alexandria, Orange Muscat, and Muscat de Frontignan.
Studying such scent subtletics as the effects of monoterpenes in the muscat of Alexandria grape a (a floral aroma) or the bitter and astringent taste of phenols led her to develop a wine aroma wheel -- a chart that lets chemists trace a wine's fruity or woody falvor, say, to its exact chemical source.