Musquet


Related to Musquet: musket

Mus´quet


n.1.See Musket.
References in periodicals archive ?
A pamphlet reports the close encounter: "a brace of musquet buletts, shot from the enemies works, hit a Cornet of his regiment with whom the Lieutenant General was then talking, but blessed be God the person aimed at escaped without any hurt.
Tupia all along warnd us not to beleive too much any thing these people told us; For says he they are given to lying, they told you that one of their people was killd by a musquet and buried Which was absolutely false.
powred over the bridge and kild and galled my souldiers from severall partes: amongst the rest Will Holies, after a musquet shot had past through his clothes, had his thigh shatt'd in pieces with a great bullet, upon which he fell and could not be carried of, the enemy prest on so violently.
Prompted by some freak of fancy, I stuck his musquet in the ground, and left it standing upright in the middle of the road" (194).
Yet so it fell out: For `tis their Custom here for all that can bear Arms, to go out on a Training Day: But I thought a Pike was best for a Young Souldier, and so I carry'd a Pike; and between you and I, Reader, there was another Reason for it too, and that was, I knew not how to shoot off a Musquet.
This must be the place Where our Columbus of the South did land; He saw the Indian village on that sand, And on this rock first met the simple race Of Australasia, who presum'd to face With lance and spear his musquet.
were twice beaten off with our musqueteers at the entrance of Derrington [Deritend], at which many of their men fell, the townes-men held them in play above an houre, we had not above one hundred and fourtie musquets and having many entrances into the towne they were many too few.
From such Series of Facts for more than 40 years, it was evident that the French Inhabitants are so far from being disposed to become good Subjects that they are more and more discovering their inveterate enmity to the English and their affection to the French, of which we have recent Instances in their Insolence to Captain Murrey hiding the best of their Arms and surrendering only their useless musquets, and in their present absolute refusal to take the Oaths of Allegiance.
There are likewise musquets and ammunition for the defence of the place, and the situation, though so retired, has its advantages.