symbiosis

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Related to Mutual dependence: mutual interdependence

sym·bi·o·sis

 (sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. sym·bi·o·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

[Greek sumbiōsis, companionship, from sumbioun, to live together, from sumbios, living together : sun-, syn- + bios, life; see gwei- in Indo-European roots.]

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

symbiosis

(ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs; ˌsɪmbaɪˈəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Biology) a close and usually obligatory association of two organisms of different species that live together, often to their mutual benefit
2. (Sociology) a similar relationship between interdependent persons or groups
[C19: via New Latin from Greek: a living together; see symbiont]
ˌsymbiˈotic, ˌsymbiˈotical adj

sym•bi•o•sis

(ˌsɪm biˈoʊ sɪs, -baɪ-)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1.
a. the living together of two dissimilar organisms, as in mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism.
b. (formerly) mutualism.
2. any interdependent or mutually beneficial relationship between two persons, groups, etc.
[1615–25; < Greek symbíōsis=symbiō-, variant s. of symbioûn to live together (sym- sym- + bioûn to live) + -sis -sis]
sym`bi•ot′ic (-ˈɒt ɪk) sym`bi•ot′i•cal, adj.
sym`bi•ot′i•cal•ly, adv.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs)
The close association between two or more different organisms of different species, often but not necessarily benefiting each member.

symbiotic adjective
Did You Know? Two organisms that live together in symbiosis may have one of three kinds of relationships: mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism. The mutualism shown by the rhinoceros and the tickbird benefits both. Riding on the rhino's back, the tickbird eats its fill of the ticks that bother the rhino while the rhino gets warning calls from the bird when it senses danger. In commensalism, one member benefits and the other is unaffected. Certain barnacles attach themselves to whales, gaining a safe home and transportation to food-rich waters. But the whales are generally unaffected by the barnacles' presence. In parasitism, though, one species generally gets hurt, as when fleas infest a dog's coat and feed on its blood.

symbiosis

a relationship or association between two or more organisms that is harmful to none of them. — symbiotic, adj.
See also: Organisms
the living together of two dissimilar organisms; the relationship may be beneficial to both (mutualism and symbiosis), beneficial to one without effect on the other (commensalism), beneficial to one and detrimental to the other (parasitism), detrimental to the first without any effect on the other (amensalism), or detrimental to both (synnecrosis). — symbiotic, adj.
See also: Biology

symbiosis

The living together of two organisms from different species for mutual benefit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.symbiosis - the relation between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
trophobiosis - a symbiotic relation in which one organism protects the other in return for some kind of food product
Translations

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs] Nsimbiosis f

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbaɪˈəʊsɪs] n
(between organisms)symbiose f
(between people, organizations, systems)symbiose f

symbiosis

nSymbiose f

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs] nsimbiosi f inv

sym·bi·o·sis

n. simbiosis, unión estrecha de dos organismos que pertenecen a especies diferentes.

symbiosis

n (psych, etc.) simbiosis f
References in classic literature ?
All that talk makes up her "name," which is handed over from one crew to another without bitterness, without animosity, with the indulgence of mutual dependence, and with the feeling of close association in the exercise of her perfections and in the danger of her defects.
It is a rule which Christians should always follow, in their judgments of one another; and especially is it right and wise among near relatives, whose characters have necessarily a degree of mutual dependence.
By the power of filial reverence and parental affection, individual existence is extended beyond the limits of individual life, and the happiness of every age is chained in mutual dependence upon that of every other.
The first two categories, unity and generational change, were earnestly appealing for people to avoid divisiveness, adopt a sense of mutual dependence, and to realise that while the youth of Independence delivered under the guidance of a few elders, the current youth too can deliver.
The Zen Buddhist teacher Thich Nhat Hanh coined this term to describe the state of mutual dependence we all live in.
In each instance, he argues, both humans and animals gained by creating a new partnership of mutual dependence and support.
INTERDICT A Prohibit B Interest C Mutual dependence who am I?
However, with the increase of random variables, the high dimensional copula function in (3) fails to capture the mutual dependence between two arbitrary variables.
The procedure takes into account the mutual dependence between the contracting government and (care) providers.
In many instances, this mutual dependence nurtured a heart-felt union between whites and blacks.