mutualism

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mu·tu·al·ism

 (myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
An association between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits.

mu′tu·al·ist n.
mu′tu·al·is′tic adj.

mutualism

(ˈmjuːtʃʊəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Biology) another name for symbiosis
ˈmutualist n, adj
ˌmutualˈistic adj

mu•tu•al•ism

(ˈmyu tʃu əˌlɪz əm)

n.
a relationship between two species of organisms in which both benefit from the association.
[1860–65]
mu′tu•al•ist, n.
mu`tu•al•is′tic, adj.

mu·tu·al·ism

(myo͞o′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
A symbiotic relationship between two organisms of different species in which each member benefits. See Note at symbiosis.

mutualism

the living together of two organisms in a mutually beneficial relationship.
See also: Biology
the principle or practice of mutual dependence as the condition of individual and social welfare. — mutualist, n.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mutualism - the relation between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
trophobiosis - a symbiotic relation in which one organism protects the other in return for some kind of food product
Translations

mutualism

[ˈmjuːtjʊəˌlɪzm] nsimbiosi f mutualistica
References in periodicals archive ?
I focus on three ecological variables that are consistently important in host-symbiont co-evolution: (1) force of infection (2) spatial structure (3) presence of mutualists (plasmids).
These brown algae, particularly Sargassum and Dictyota species, are the most common plants co-occurring with Oculina on both natural and artificial reefs [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED], and are thus critical targets for removal by potential mutualists.
Price and Jenkins (1986) pointed out that whether nutcrackers are mutualists can be determined depending on whether pines evolve traits that deter nutcrackers in the absence of squirrels.
She focuses on three abundant gut bacteria of fungus-growing ants that were recently discovered by the host group, and which appear to function as nutritional and disease resistance mutualists in this complex symbiosis that has become one of the best-studied model systems of social evolution.
Species may be eliminated, allowing ecological release of competitors or negative effects on mutualists.
These microbial mutualists have the ability to adapt rapidly to changing environments, and could potentially play a key role in the local adaptation of their host, especially in the context of rapid environmental changes imposed by human activities.
stricta documented here indicates potential for resident ants to act as plant mutualists and limit the success of C.
For example, studies commonly assume that pollinators behave exclusively as plant mutualists.
Novel weapons: invasive plant suppresses fungal mutualists in America but not in its native Europe.
Just as geneticists have used genetic variation in Drosophila to understand gene function and regulation, ecologists may utilize the genetic variation in hybrids to examine plant defense mechanisms, direct interactions with herbivores, pathogens, and mutualists, and indirect interactions with other trophic levels.
Fungi are critical components of ecosystems, functioning as decomposers, mutualists and pathogens.
An important consequence of this origin may be that not every aspect of the interaction between two mutualists is mutually beneficial.