myrrhine


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myrrhine

(ˈmɪraɪn; ˈmɪrɪn)
adj
(Ceramics) a variant spelling of murrhine
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
To whom the Son of God, unmoved, replied:-- "Nor doth this grandeur and majestic shew Of luxury, though called magnificence, More than of arms before, allure mine eye, Much less my mind; though thou should'st add to tell Their sumptuous gluttonies, and gorgeous feasts On citron tables or Atlantic stone (For I have also heard, perhaps have read), Their wines of Setia, Cales, and Falerne, Chios and Crete, and how they quaff in gold, Crystal, and myrrhine cups, imbossed with gems And studs of pearl--to me should'st tell, who thirst And hunger still.
The subject of the verb here is ho adikon (the wrongdoer) and the main plot concerns the rape and pregnancy of Myrrhine.
83) of the newly-arrived Lampito from Sparta, while another Athenian woman, Myrrhine, appraisingly comments on the [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] ('lowland region', 88) of the newly-arrived Ismenia from Boiotia--a clear reference to the plains of Boiotia, the latter's heimat.
The articles, which first appeared from 1963 to 2007, cover such topics as a clay ball from Myrrhine, a toadlike creature in Hamburg, the meanings behind headless winged humans, the sexual and asexual in Greek vase painting, the association of animal categories with terms of abuse, Beazley's approach to vases, characters in various stages of distress on vases, evidence of Greek ritual, the art of flying, Parmenides's symbols and teaching, identity in Gnothi, the Buddha of Anaximandre, the tortoise of Zenon, the importance of eyes, and recent works applying new principles to very old material objects.
Against Pericles' remark that the only good woman is an unknown woman, Connelly assembles a large, beautifully reproduced, and often moving collection of monuments that commemorated priestesses in public life, from the fifth century BCE Athenian Myrrhine, whose grave marker proclaimed that her "name accompanied her glory" to the third century CE Berenike of Syros, whose long record of service (carefully inscribed on her gravestone) won her a gold crown and a public funeral.
Notaro play the main characters, Kinesias and Myrrhine, in the FSC production.
We encounter the mother of Memnon who complains that Achilles has killed her son; Olympia, the mother of Alexandros, who daydreams about her absent son; Livia, the mother of Tiberius, who appears nursing the future emperor; the mother of Narcissus who consoles him over his deceased twin sister; Myrrhine the courtesan, cast as radically failed mother; the infinitely self-sacrificing mother of "La madre," and finally, in the closing poem of the collection, the Virgin Mother seen with the Christ child at his nativity.
Tenor Chad Shelton sang ringingly as Lysistrata's lover, the Athenian general Nico, mezzo-sopranos Myrna Paris (Athenian peacenik Kleonike) and Victoria Livengood lent solid support (Lampito, a Spartan convert to pacifism) and bass Joshua Winograde and soprano Laquita Mitchell were appealing as the Spartan general, Leonidas, and Kinesias's beloved, Myrrhine.
lady (1626); A spirituall posie for Zion (1629); A myrrhine posie of the bitter dolours of Christ his passion (1639).
reading of the name Myrrhene, preferring Beroaldus' correction Myrrhine, a wellattested 'real' name (which she concedes has various orthographies) with appropriately erotic associations (336, on Met.
The spurious biography of Hyperides provides an apposite example, since it relates how this orator was partial to sex to the extent that he threw his son out of the house and brought in Myrrhine the most expensive hetaira, kept Aristagora in Piraeus and the Theban Phila on his estate at Eleusis (849D; cf.
This would mean that Kalonike or Myrrhine could be played by the Chorus Leader, but such a degree of individuation of the Chorus Leader is not paralleled elsewhere.