mystery play

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Related to N-Town Plays: Mystery plays

mystery play

n.
A medieval drama based on scriptural events especially in the life of Jesus.

[From mystery.]

mystery play

n
(Theatre) (in the Middle Ages) a type of drama based on the life of Christ. Compare miracle play

mys′tery play`


n.
a medieval drama based on a Bible story, usu. about Christ. Compare miracle play, morality play.
[1850–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mystery play - a medieval play representing episodes from the life of Christ
drama, dramatic play, play - a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage; "he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway"
Translations

mystery play

nmistero
References in periodicals archive ?
5) See Meredith, The Mary Play, 105 n1002-25, Sugano, The N-Town Plays, 368 nn421-56, and Granger, The N-Town Play: Drama and Liturgy in Medieval East Anglia (Cambridge, 2009), 128-9, and 'Reading Her Psalter', passim.
The English compilation of biblical pageants that we call the N-Town Plays comes from a time and place of intense Marian devotion; the cult of the Virgin dominated late medieval East Anglia, "England's Nazareth.
7) The quotations from the N-Town plays will be taken from Spector's edition (1991) and numbers of the lines refer to this edition.
19) The text of the N-town plays, however, may record a staging of this part of the secret Passion while the Jews are playing hot cockles with Jesus:
Blake, 99-114), one with the use made of the Mirror in the N-Town Plays (Richard Beadle, 1-17), while A.
7) The few critics who have dealt at length with the N-Town plays, then, all acknowledge that anachronism creates a close link between representations of community in the plays and the developing culture of late-medieval East Anglian communities.
Typically, the N-Town plays are grave and dignified; the comic relief distinguishing other surviving cycles (from Chester, York, Wakefield) is markedly absent.
In the past decade there has not been one article devoted to the relationship between the N-Town Plays and liturgy.
Moreover, the N-town plays, compiled into the form of a cycle (53) in the late fifteenth century, provide a provocative possibility as a model for the Chester reviser.
The N-Town plays offer the most extensive dramatisation of the event whilst the Chester cycle, somewhat consistently with its overall attitude towards women (Coletti 1990: 89), omits it altogether.
Analysis of the milieu and audience of the N-town plays is clearly and properly beginning to benefit from the increasing scholarly interest in provincial patrons and, in particular, in the literary tastes and activities of the East Anglian gentry and clergy.