notes


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note

 (nōt)
n.
1.
a. A brief record, especially one written down to aid the memory: took notes on the lecture.
b. A comment or explanation, as on a passage in a text: The allusion is explained in the notes at the end of the chapter.
2.
a. A brief informal letter: sent a note to the child's teacher. See Synonyms at letter.
b. A formal written diplomatic or official communication.
3.
a. A piece of paper currency.
b. A debt security, usually with a maturity of ten years or less.
c. A promissory note.
4. Music
a. A tone of definite pitch.
b. A symbol for such a tone, indicating pitch by its position on the staff and duration by its shape.
c. A key of an instrument, such as a piano.
5. The characteristic vocal sound made by a songbird or other animal: the clear note of a cardinal.
6. The sign of a particular quality or emotion: a note of despair in his remarks; a note of gaiety in her manner.
7. A distinctive component of a complex flavor or aroma: a full-bodied wine with notes of cherry and musk.
8. Importance; consequence: Nothing of note happened.
9. Notice; observation: quietly took note of the scene.
10. Obsolete A song, melody, or tune.
tr.v. not·ed, not·ing, notes
1. To observe carefully; notice: Note the difference between these two plants. See Synonyms at see1.
2. To make a note of; write down: noted the time of each arrival.
3. To show; indicate: a reporter careful to note sources of information.
4. To make mention of; remark: noted the lateness of his arrival.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin nota, annotation; see gnō- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

not′er n.

notes

(nəʊts)
pl n
1. short descriptive or summarized jottings taken down for future reference
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a record of impressions, reflections, etc, esp as a literary form

NOTES

(nəʊts)
abbreviation for
natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery, a surgical technique for operating on internal organs through bodily orifices
Translations
References in classic literature ?
March was both surprised and touched, and smiled with her eyes full as she examined her presents and read the little notes which accompanied them.
For a time she had been beset with a madness for writing notes which she addressed to Seth.
He was making some notes, doubtless for a future book.
I had to confess that mine had not gone beyond a few straggling notes.
He could speak a little Spanish, and also a language which nobody understood, unless it was the mocking-bird that hung on the other side of the door, whistling his fluty notes out upon the breeze with maddening persistence.
It is believed that the scene of this tale, and most of the information necessary to understand its allusions, are rendered sufficiently obvious to the reader in the text itself, or in the accompanying notes.
This situation continued a month, and with new aggravations and particular notes, the note above all, sharper and sharper, of the small ironic consciousness on the part of my pupils.
Lank Bildad, as pilot, headed the first watch, and ever and anon, as the old craft deep dived into the green seas, and sent the shivering frost all over her, and the winds howled, and the cordage rang, his steady notes were heard, -- Sweet fields beyond the swelling flood, Stand dressed in living green.
It was a calm, sweet April night; there were no sounds but a few low notes of a nightingale, and nothing moved but the white clouds near the moon and a brown owl that flitted over the hedge.
In the end all three of them begin advancing, step by step, upon the banqueters, Valentinavyczia, he cellist, bumping along with his instrument between notes.
He had, however, speculated largely and quite loosely; had involved himself deeply, and his notes to a large amount had come into the hands of Haley; and this small piece of information is the key to the preceding conversation.
When he came to grene wode, In a mery mornynge, There he herde the notes small Of byrdes mery syngynge.