Nag Hammadi Library


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Noun1.Nag Hammadi Library - a collection of 13 ancient papyrus codices translated from Greek into Coptic that were discovered by farmers near the town of Nag Hammadi in 1945; the codices contain 45 distinct works including the chief sources of firsthand knowledge of Gnosticism
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They were then compiled into the Nag Hammadi library at Oxford University and are mostly written in Coptic, though Biblical Scholars at the University of Texas noted that the manuscript didn't fit with the others.
It was discovered near Nag Hammadi, Egypt, in December 1945 among a group of books known as the Nag Hammadi library.
Examining every surviving text written by heresiologists, accounts often ignored in favor of the famous Nag Hammadi Library, Tobias Churton reveals the most secret inner teaching passed down by initiated societies: the tradition of sexual gnosis--higher union with God through the sacrament of sex.
Clontz; THE COMPREHENSIVE NEW TESTAMENT: NEW TESTAMENT WITH COMPLETE TEXTUAL VARIANT MAPPING AND REFERENCES FOR THE DEAD SEA SCROLLS PHILO JOSEPHUS NAG HAMMADI LIBRARY PSEUDEPIGRAPHA; Cornerstone Publications $16.
The first level sections cover gnosticism in general, non-Nag Hammadi gnostic texts, gnostic schools and leaders, the New Testament and gnosticism, and the Nag Hammadi library itself.
The Nag Hammadi Library after Fifty Years, Proceedings of the 1995 Society of Biblical Literature Commemoration (NHMS XLIV), E.
Most of the letters, treatises and gospels contained in the Nag Hammadi Library are Gnostic in origin.
But in preparing The Beekeeper, Amos began to research the earliest days of Christianity, moving beyond Matthew, Mark, Luke and John to investigate the various gnostic gospels of the Nag Hammadi Library that were discovered in Egypt in 1945.
Meanwhile, at least in the early chapters, some attempt is made to assign teleological significance to Rothstein's loan-sharking and other corruptions by invoking ancient Sumer, the Gnostic Gospels from the Nag Hammadi library, the histories of Josephus Flavius, the plays of Menander, the dropping of atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the bad behaviors of the current Bush Administration, and the life and times of Louie the Lump.
In supporting his claim, he appeals primarily to three sources associated with Valentinus in the second century: the Gospel of Truth and the Tripartite Tractate from the Nag Hammadi Library and Irenaeus's presentation of Ptolemy's doctrine, a presentation he sees as supported by the 20th-century discoveries.
If the earlier date holds for the Gnostic gospels, then the importance of the Nag Hammadi Library is monumental, because it would show that there was a powerful Gnostic movement among Christians during the second and third centuries offering an alternative to the New Testament's version of Jesus.
The text of the Gospel of Thomas exists in its entirety only in the Coptic version discovered as part of the Nag Hammadi library, which was buried in the fourth century and unearthed in Egypt in 1945.