napkin

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nap·kin

 (năp′kĭn)
n.
1. A piece of cloth or absorbent paper used at table to protect the clothes or wipe the lips and fingers.
2. A cloth or towel.
3. A sanitary napkin.
4. Chiefly British A diaper.

[Middle English : Old French nape, nappe, tablecloth; see nappe + -kin, -kin.]

napkin

(ˈnæpkɪn)
n
1. Also called: table napkin a usually square piece of cloth or paper used while eating to protect the clothes, wipe the mouth, etc; serviette
2. rare a similar piece of cloth used for example as a handkerchief or headscarf
3. a more formal name for nappy1
4. a less common term for sanitary towel
[C15: from Old French, from nape tablecloth, from Latin mappa small cloth, towel; see map]

nap•kin

(ˈnæp kɪn)

n.
1. a small piece of cloth or paper, usu. square, for use in wiping the lips and fingers and to protect the clothes while eating.
3. Chiefly Brit. diaper.
4. Scot. and North Eng. handkerchief.
5. Scot. kerchief.
[1350–1400; Middle English, =nape tablecloth (< Middle French nappe < Latin mappa napkin) + -kin -kin; compare map]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.napkin - a small piece of table linen that is used to wipe the mouth and to cover the lap in order to protect clothingnapkin - a small piece of table linen that is used to wipe the mouth and to cover the lap in order to protect clothing
bib - a napkin tied under the chin of a child while eating
dinner napkin - a large napkin used when dinner is served
napery, table linen - linens for the dining table
tea napkin - a small napkin used when tea is served
2.napkin - garment consisting of a folded cloth drawn up between the legs and fastened at the waistnapkin - garment consisting of a folded cloth drawn up between the legs and fastened at the waist; worn by infants to catch excrement
garment - an article of clothing; "garments of the finest silk"

napkin

noun serviette, cloth She dabbed her lips carefully with a napkin.
Translations
الشَّكل الكامِل للكَلِمَه السابِقَه في 1فوطَهمِنْدِيلُ الْـمَائِدَةِمِنْدِيلُ الـمَائِدَة
ubrousekplena
servietble
lautasliinaservettiterveyssidevaippa
ubrus
egészségügyi betétpelenkasálszalvéta
bleyjaservíetta, munnòurrka
ナプキン
냅킨식탁용 냅킨
palutėservetėlėvystyklas
autiņisalvete
plienka
prtič
servett
ผ้าเช็ดปากผ้าเช็ดปากบนโต๊ะอาหาร
peçetekağıt peçetenappynin tam şekli
khăn ăn

napkin

[ˈnæpkɪn]
A. N (= table napkin) → servilleta f (Brit) (baby's) → pañal m (US) (= sanitary towel) → compresa f higiénica, paño m higiénico
B. CPD napkin ring Nservilletero m

napkin

[ˈnæpkɪn] nserviette f (de table)napkin ring nrond m de serviette

napkin

n
(= table napkin)Serviette f, → Mundtuch nt (old)
(for baby) → Windel f; (US: = sanitary napkin) → (Damen)binde f

napkin

[ˈnæpkɪn] n (also table napkin) → tovagliolo, salvietta

napkin

(ˈnӕpkin) noun
1. (also table napkin) a small piece of cloth or paper for protecting the clothes from drips etc and for wiping the lips at meals.
2. full form of nappy.

napkin

مِنْدِيلُ الْـمَائِدَةِ, مِنْدِيلُ الـمَائِدَة ubrousek serviet Serviette πετσέτα φαγητού servilleta lautasliina serviette ubrus tovagliolo ナプキン 냅킨, 식탁용 냅킨 servet serviett serwetka guardanapo салфетка servett ผ้าเช็ดปาก, ผ้าเช็ดปากบนโต๊ะอาหาร kağıt peçete, peçete khăn ăn 餐巾, 餐巾纸

napkin

n. servilleta.

napkin

V. sanitary.
References in classic literature ?
They drew up to the table, exchanged their handkerchiefs for napkins, and in ten minutes were all right again.
Every one knows what a multitude of things --beds, sauce-pans, knives and forks, shovels and tongs, napkins, nut-crackers, and what not, are indispensable to the business of housekeeping.
I never did see ladies doin' no sich; my old Missis nor Miss Marie never did, and I don't see no kinder need on 't;" and Dinah stalked indignantly about, while Miss Ophelia piled and sorted dishes, emptied dozens of scattering bowls of sugar into one receptacle, sorted napkins, table-cloths, and towels, for washing; washing, wiping, and arranging with her own hands, and with a speed and alacrity which perfectly amazed Dinah.
She talked for hours about mere nothings, on a dozen napkins marked "Z," placed in the closet before the "O's.
Coquenard, they arose slowly from the table, folded their napkins more slowly still, bowed, and retired.
Visions of good and ill breeding, of old vulgarisms and new gentilities, were before her; and she was meditating much upon silver forks, napkins, and finger-glasses.
Whilst burning-hot napkins, physic, revulsives, and Guenaud, who was recalled, were performing their functions with increased activity, Colbert, holding his great head in both his hands, to compress within it the fever of the projects engendered by the brain, was meditating the tenor of the donation he would make Mazarin write, at the first hour of respite his disease should afford him.
Father Brown was surprised to see the whole dining-table set out as for a festive meal, with napkins in their rings, and wine-glasses of some six unnecessary shapes set beside every plate.
The impostor who does duty as a barber brings his pans and napkins and implements of torture to your residence and deliberately skins you in your private apartments.
There was one seedy French waiter, who was attempting to learn English in a house where he never heard anything but French; and the customers were a few ladies of easy virtue, a menage or two, who had their own napkins reserved for them, and a few queer men who came in for hurried, scanty meals.
It had been a simple, a nutritious diet; but there had been nothing exciting about it, and the odour of Burgundy, and the smell of French sauces, and the sight of clean napkins and long loaves, knocked as a very welcome visitor at the door of our inner man.
When our old students return to Tuskegee now, as they often do, and go into our large, beautiful, well-ventilated, and well-lighted dining room, and see tempting, well-cooked food--largely grown by the students themselves--and see tables, neat tablecloths and napkins, and vases of flowers upon the tables, and hear singing birds, and note that each meal is served exactly upon the minute, with no disorder, and with almost no complaint coming from the hundreds that now fill our dining room, they, too, often say to me that they are glad that we started as we did, and built ourselves up year by year, by a slow and natural process of growth.