napkin

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nap·kin

 (năp′kĭn)
n.
1. A piece of cloth or absorbent paper used at table to protect the clothes or wipe the lips and fingers.
2. A cloth or towel.
3. A sanitary napkin.
4. Chiefly British A diaper.

[Middle English : Old French nape, nappe, tablecloth; see nappe + -kin, -kin.]

napkin

(ˈnæpkɪn)
n
1. Also called: table napkin a usually square piece of cloth or paper used while eating to protect the clothes, wipe the mouth, etc; serviette
2. rare a similar piece of cloth used for example as a handkerchief or headscarf
3. a more formal name for nappy1
4. a less common term for sanitary towel
[C15: from Old French, from nape tablecloth, from Latin mappa small cloth, towel; see map]

nap•kin

(ˈnæp kɪn)

n.
1. a small piece of cloth or paper, usu. square, for use in wiping the lips and fingers and to protect the clothes while eating.
3. Chiefly Brit. diaper.
4. Scot. and North Eng. handkerchief.
5. Scot. kerchief.
[1350–1400; Middle English, =nape tablecloth (< Middle French nappe < Latin mappa napkin) + -kin -kin; compare map]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.napkin - a small piece of table linen that is used to wipe the mouth and to cover the lap in order to protect clothingnapkin - a small piece of table linen that is used to wipe the mouth and to cover the lap in order to protect clothing
bib - a napkin tied under the chin of a child while eating
dinner napkin - a large napkin used when dinner is served
napery, table linen - linens for the dining table
tea napkin - a small napkin used when tea is served
2.napkin - garment consisting of a folded cloth drawn up between the legs and fastened at the waistnapkin - garment consisting of a folded cloth drawn up between the legs and fastened at the waist; worn by infants to catch excrement
garment - an article of clothing; "garments of the finest silk"

napkin

noun serviette, cloth She dabbed her lips carefully with a napkin.
Translations
الشَّكل الكامِل للكَلِمَه السابِقَه في 1فوطَهمِنْدِيلُ الْـمَائِدَةِمِنْدِيلُ الـمَائِدَة
ubrousekplena
servietble
lautasliinaservettiterveyssidevaippa
ubrus
egészségügyi betétpelenkasálszalvéta
bleyjaservíetta, munnòurrka
ナプキン
냅킨식탁용 냅킨
palutėservetėlėvystyklas
autiņisalvete
plienka
prtič
servett
ผ้าเช็ดปากผ้าเช็ดปากบนโต๊ะอาหาร
peçetekağıt peçetenappynin tam şekli
khăn ăn

napkin

[ˈnæpkɪn]
A. N (= table napkin) → servilleta f (Brit) (baby's) → pañal m (US) (= sanitary towel) → compresa f higiénica, paño m higiénico
B. CPD napkin ring Nservilletero m

napkin

[ˈnæpkɪn] nserviette f (de table)napkin ring nrond m de serviette

napkin

n
(= table napkin)Serviette f, → Mundtuch nt (old)
(for baby) → Windel f; (US: = sanitary napkin) → (Damen)binde f

napkin

[ˈnæpkɪn] n (also table napkin) → tovagliolo, salvietta

napkin

(ˈnӕpkin) noun
1. (also table napkin) a small piece of cloth or paper for protecting the clothes from drips etc and for wiping the lips at meals.
2. full form of nappy.

napkin

مِنْدِيلُ الْـمَائِدَةِ, مِنْدِيلُ الـمَائِدَة ubrousek serviet Serviette πετσέτα φαγητού servilleta lautasliina serviette ubrus tovagliolo ナプキン 냅킨, 식탁용 냅킨 servet serviett serwetka guardanapo салфетка servett ผ้าเช็ดปาก, ผ้าเช็ดปากบนโต๊ะอาหาร kağıt peçete, peçete khăn ăn 餐巾, 餐巾纸

napkin

n. servilleta.

napkin

V. sanitary.
References in classic literature ?
On the marble slab were two plates, two napkins, two rolls of bread, and a dish, with another napkin in it, on which reposed two quaint little black balls.
Oblonsky took off his overcoat, and with his hat over one ear walked into the dining room, giving directions to the Tatar waiters, who were clustered about him in evening coats, bearing napkins.
I never did see ladies doin' no sich; my old Missis nor Miss Marie never did, and I don't see no kinder need on 't;" and Dinah stalked indignantly about, while Miss Ophelia piled and sorted dishes, emptied dozens of scattering bowls of sugar into one receptacle, sorted napkins, table-cloths, and towels, for washing; washing, wiping, and arranging with her own hands, and with a speed and alacrity which perfectly amazed Dinah.
Athos called Grimaud, pointed to a large basket which lay in a corner, and made a sign to him to wrap the viands up in the napkins.
Lemons, oranges and paper napkins, arranged with mathematical precision, sat among the glasses.
Every one knows what a multitude of things --beds, sauce-pans, knives and forks, shovels and tongs, napkins, nut-crackers, and what not, are indispensable to the business of housekeeping.
We did every thing by mass-meeting, in the good old national way, from swapping off one empire for another on the programme of the voyage down to complaining of the cookery and the scarcity of napkins.
There was one seedy French waiter, who was attempting to learn English in a house where he never heard anything but French; and the customers were a few ladies of easy virtue, a menage or two, who had their own napkins reserved for them, and a few queer men who came in for hurried, scanty meals.
Everything from the table napkins to the silver, china, and glass bore that imprint of newness found in the households of the newly married.
It had been a simple, a nutritious diet; but there had been nothing exciting about it, and the odour of Burgundy, and the smell of French sauces, and the sight of clean napkins and long loaves, knocked as a very welcome visitor at the door of our inner man.
I may leave her now with her sheets and collars and napkins and fronts.
Yes, he must bring out seats and food for both, and in serving us present not ewer and napkin with more show of respect to the one than to the other.