Naples


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Na·ples

 (nā′pəlz)
1. also Na·po·li (nä′pô-lē) A city of south-central Italy on the Bay of Naples, an arm of the Tyrrhenian Sea. Founded by Greeks c. 600 bc, Naples was conquered by the Romans in the fourth century bc. It became an independent duchy (eighth century ad) and capital of the kingdom of Naples (1282-1861). It is a major seaport and a commercial, cultural, and tourist center.
2. A city of southern Florida on the Gulf of Mexico. Isolated to the east by the Everglades, it is a popular resort.

Naples

(ˈneɪpəlz)
n
1. (Placename) a port in SW Italy, capital of Campania region, on the Bay of Naples: the third largest city in the country; founded by Greeks in the 6th century bc; incorporated into the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies in 1140 and its capital (1282–1503); university (1224). Pop: 1 004 500 (2001). Ancient name: Neapolis Italian name: Napoli
2. (Placename) Bay of Naples an inlet of the Tyrrhenian Sea in the SW coast of Italy

Na•ples

(ˈneɪ pəlz)

n.
1. Italian, Napoli. a seaport in SW Italy, on the Bay of Naples. 1,200,958.
2. Bay of, an inlet of the Tyrrhenian Sea. 22 mi. (35 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Naples - a port and tourist center in southwestern ItalyNaples - a port and tourist center in southwestern Italy; capital of the Campania region
Campania - a region of southwestern Italy on the Tyrrhenian Sea including the islands of Capri and Ischia
Neopolitan - a resident of Naples
Neapolitan - a native or inhabitant of Naples
Translations
Neapol
Napoli
Nápoly
Neapol
Neapelj
Napoli

Naples

[ˈneɪplz] NNápoles m

Naples

[ˈneɪpəlz] nNaples

Naples

nNeapel nt

Naples

[ˈneɪplz] nNapoli f
References in classic literature ?
He was so sure that he really was the King of Naples that when, on the eve of his departure from that city, while walking through the streets with his wife, some Italians called out to him: "Viva il re
But though he firmly believed himself to be King of Naples and pitied the grief felt by the subjects he was abandoning, latterly, after he had been ordered to return to military service- and especially since his last interview with Napoleon in Danzig, when his august brother-in-law had told him: "I made you King that you should reign in my way, but not in yours
There are too many English in Naples itself, though I thought it would make a first happy hunting-ground when I knew the language better and had altered myself a bit more.
The new are either entirely new, as was Milan to Francesco Sforza, or they are, as it were, members annexed to the hereditary state of the prince who has acquired them, as was the kingdom of Naples to that of the King of Spain.
Through all the flimsy things we see at once As easily as through a Naples bonnet - Trash of all trash
From Leghorn to Naples (calling at Civita Vecchia to land any who may prefer to go to Rome from that point), the distance will be made in about thirty-six hours; the route will lay along the coast of Italy, close by Caprera, Elba, and Corsica.
Then, brother," I replied, "you can return to your China, post haste or at whatever haste you are bound to go, as I am not fit for so long a travel and, besides being ill, I am very much without money, while Emperor for Emperor and Monarch for Monarch, I have at Naples the great Count of Lemos, who, without so many petty titles of colleges and rectorships, sustains me, protects me and does me more favour than I can wish for.
It would happen immediately if I were to begin here, as I intended to do, with: "Rome has its Corso, Naples its Toledo"--"Ah
de Monte Cristo for letters to the directors of the theatres at Rome and Naples, I expressed my fears of travelling as a woman; he perfectly understood them, and undertook to procure for me a man's passport, and two days after I received this, to which I have added with my own hand, `travelling with his sister.
We propose to take up our abode, for a time at least, in the neighborhood of Naples.
The Bay of Naples was never so divine, and he wrote of "faery lands forlorn," as though the poetry sprang unbidden to his pen.
It was there he caught the fever which held him back on the eve of his departure for Greece and of which he lay ill so long in Naples.