narrative

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nar·ra·tive

 (năr′ə-tĭv)
n.
1. A narrated account; a story.
2. The art, technique, or process of narrating: the highest form of narrative.
3.
a. A presentation of real-world events that connects them in a storylike way: "There has been less of a coherent, connected media narrative and more of a kind of episodic focus on events, controversies and gaffes" (Mark Jurkowitz).
b. An explanation or interpretation of events in accordance with a particular theory, ideology, or point of view: the competing narratives of capitalism and Marxism.
adj.
1. Consisting of or characterized by the telling of a story: narrative poetry.
2. Of or relating to narration: narrative skill.

nar′ra·tive·ly adv.

narrative

(ˈnærətɪv)
n
1. an account, report, or story, as of events, experiences, etc
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the narrative the part of a literary work that relates events
3. the process or technique of narrating
adj
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) telling a story: a narrative poem.
5. of or relating to narration: narrative art.
ˈnarratively adv

nar•ra•tive

(ˈnær ə tɪv)

n.
1. a story or account of events, experiences, or the like, whether true or fictitious.
2. the art, technique, or process of narrating.
adj.
3. consisting of or being a narrative: narrative poetry.
4. of or pertaining to narration.
5. representing stories or events pictorially or sculpturally: narrative painting.
[1555–65; < Latin]
nar′ra•tive•ly, adv.

narrative

  • narratage - The technique of having one character in the role of storyteller or the act of inserting bits of explanation into a narrative.
  • narrative - First an adjective meaning "telling the facts of a story," from Latin narrare, which is also the base of narrate.
  • saga - Old Norse for "narrative."
  • diegesis - The narrative or plot.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.narrative - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of eventsnarrative - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of events; presented in writing or drama or cinema or as a radio or television program; "his narrative was interesting"; "Disney's stories entertain adults as well as children"
tearjerker - an excessively sentimental narrative
subject matter, content, message, substance - what a communication that is about something is about
tall tale - an improbable (unusual or incredible or fanciful) story
folk tale, folktale - a tale circulated by word of mouth among the common folk
sob story, sob stuff - a sentimental story (or drama) of personal distress; designed to arouse sympathy
fairy story, fairy tale, fairytale - a story about fairies; told to amuse children
nursery rhyme - a tale in rhymed verse for children
Adj.1.narrative - consisting of or characterized by the telling of a storynarrative - consisting of or characterized by the telling of a story; "narrative poetry"
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray

narrative

noun story, report, history, detail, account, statement, tale, chronicle, recital He began his narrative with the day of the murder.

narrative

noun
Translations
رِوائي، قَصَصي
historkanaracenarativnípříběhvyprávěcí
fortælling
jutustus
kertomus
saga, frásögn
物語
breedsprakigspraakzaamverhaalverhalendverslag

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
A. ADJnarrativo
B. N (= act) → narración f; (= story) → narración f, relato m

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
nrécit m
adj [style, poem] → narratif/ive

narrative

n
(= story)Erzählung f; (= account)Schilderung f; (= text)Text m
(= act of narrating)Erzählen nt; (of events, journey)Schilderung f; he has a gift for narrativeer ist ein talentierter Erzähler
adjerzählend; ability etcerzählerisch; narrative poemBallade f; (modern) → Erzählgedicht nt; narrative structureErzählstruktur f

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
1. adjnarrativo/a
2. nnarrazione f; (technique) → narrativa

narrate

(nəˈreit) verb
to tell (a story). He narrated the events of the afternoon.
narˈration noun
narrative (ˈnarətiv) noun
a story. an exciting narrative.
narˈrator noun
1. a person who tells a story.
2. a person who tells you what is happening or explains something in a film.
References in classic literature ?
All the earlier part is a retrospect, in a narrative form, relating to an event which took place about a year before.
There is no need for me to say whether my own opinion does or does not sanction the disclosure of the remarkable family story, of which my narrative forms an important component part.
Describe in narrative form the vendors approach and technical plan for accomplishing the work listed herein.
unpacks his understanding of the "Jesuit DNA" largely through the narrative form, inspired by a suggestion by the pope that the Society of Jesus can be described only in narrative form (32).
is told in gently expressive narrative form, with charming realistic paintings of the gray cat in all his adventures.
As Rudd helpfully explains, the book as a whole defends four closely connected claims about persons: namely, that selves are not pre-given entities, rather they are partly "self-constructed" by the human beings who form them in response to received aspects of personality and social relations; that a human being forms a self partly through cultivating a narrative understanding of his life-story (in negotiation with others' interpretation of who he is); that this narrative form of identity and self-formation requires evaluative judgments and attitudes that depend on real values; and that their objective status for us is rooted partly in a (supernatural human telos.
The text puts the known facts in narrative form for general readers interested in Ross and historians specializing in the Civil War era, the abolitionist movement, or late 19th century New Mexico.
Everything is presented in narrative form--often quite dry narrative form.
The book is written in an unconventional style; rather than the traditional narrative form of a memoir, it is a collection of short comedy pieces - stories, essays, sketches and spoofs.
This version is excellent for this purpose in that the core stories (in fifty episodes) are retold in a contemporary narrative form and attractively illustrated.
The "Conclusion" wishes that the study serve as a buttress to the author's previously published Proppian analyses of the Popol Vuh and Miguel Angel Asturias's El Senor Presidente (1946), suggesting that "the human brain has created--and, indeed, can create--only a restricted number of pristine, core narrative structures; that all stories are variants of these said core narrative structures" (125); and that "what Propp has discovered is the pristine, morphologic, core structure of narrative form from which subsequent diegetic schemes derive" (125).
That these claims are as ungrounded in any elaborated theory of reading as they are in a theory of narrative form makes them less convincing than they might be, and less fruitful for the argument as a whole.